Heterogeneous functional expression of calcium channels at sensory and synaptic regions in nodose neurons

D. Mendelowitz, P. J. Reynolds, Michael Andresen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. In the present study we have taken advantage of the unique anatomy of visceral sensory neurons that enabled us to isolate and examine the role of calcium channel subtypes at the soma, central synaptic terminals, and peripheral sensory endings. 2. N-type calcium channels dominated somatic currents (60%), with lesser (16% and 12%) contributions from P- and L-type channels, respectively, in patch-clamped dispersed nodose neurons using toxins selective for each calcium channel subtype. 3. These toxins also blocked the release of neurotransmitters from these visceral synaptic terminals in a brain stem slice. Similar to the profile at the soma, N-type calcium channels were most responsible for neurotransmission at this central glutamatergic synapse (57%), with P- and L-type channels making small contributions (12% and 11%, respectively). 4. In contrast to the soma and central synapses, these calcium channel toxins failed to affect the sensory transduction at aortic baroreceptor endings. 5. Therefore calcium channel subtypes have dramatically heterogenous distributions in sensory neurons that presumably subserve the specialized functions that occur at different cellular regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)872-875
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume73
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1995

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Calcium Channels
Carisoprodol
N-Type Calcium Channels
Neurons
Presynaptic Terminals
Sensory Receptor Cells
Synapses
Pressoreceptors
Synaptic Transmission
Brain Stem
Neurotransmitter Agents
Anatomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Heterogeneous functional expression of calcium channels at sensory and synaptic regions in nodose neurons. / Mendelowitz, D.; Reynolds, P. J.; Andresen, Michael.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 73, No. 2, 1995, p. 872-875.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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