Hepatic resection of solitary HCC in the elderly: A unique disease in a growing population

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Abstract

Background: Management of elderly patients with solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (sHCC) is challenging with perceived clinicopathologic differences driving treatment options. We sought to determine factors predictive of disease control and survival after hepatic resection of sHCC in elderly patients. Methods: We identified n = 45 elderly patients (³≥65 yo) with sHCC treated with hepatic resection alone from our prospective database from 2003–16. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed and survival was assessed from the time of hepatic resection. Results: The median age was 75-years-old. Less than half of patients (47%) had viral hepatitis. At resection, the median Child-Pugh score was A6, median tumor size 5 cm, and mean AFP of 1050 (ng/mL). Major hepatectomy was performed in 23 patients (51%) with R0 resection achieved in 96%. Two patients (4%) had Grade III complications with no mortalities at 30 days and one death (2%) at 90-days. After R0 resection 44% (n = 20) had intrahepatic recurrence at a median of 32 months (95% CI: 15–46) with 20% (n = 9) developing extrahepatic recurrence at a median of 78 months (95% CI: 78-.). The median survival was 72 months (95% CI: 30–108 months). For patients with at least 3 years of follow-up, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival was 74%, 59%, and 50%, respectively. Mortality was associated with higher AFP and lower Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI). Conclusion: Carefully selected elderly patients with sHCC appear to have unique disease that is amenable to hepatic resection with low morbidity and mortality with excellent overall and recurrence-free survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Liver
Population
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Survival
Recurrence
Mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Hepatectomy
Hepatitis
Databases
Morbidity
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{56973940047e49e9b4ca22f1cd94429e,
title = "Hepatic resection of solitary HCC in the elderly: A unique disease in a growing population",
abstract = "Background: Management of elderly patients with solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (sHCC) is challenging with perceived clinicopathologic differences driving treatment options. We sought to determine factors predictive of disease control and survival after hepatic resection of sHCC in elderly patients. Methods: We identified n = 45 elderly patients (³≥65 yo) with sHCC treated with hepatic resection alone from our prospective database from 2003–16. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed and survival was assessed from the time of hepatic resection. Results: The median age was 75-years-old. Less than half of patients (47{\%}) had viral hepatitis. At resection, the median Child-Pugh score was A6, median tumor size 5 cm, and mean AFP of 1050 (ng/mL). Major hepatectomy was performed in 23 patients (51{\%}) with R0 resection achieved in 96{\%}. Two patients (4{\%}) had Grade III complications with no mortalities at 30 days and one death (2{\%}) at 90-days. After R0 resection 44{\%} (n = 20) had intrahepatic recurrence at a median of 32 months (95{\%} CI: 15–46) with 20{\%} (n = 9) developing extrahepatic recurrence at a median of 78 months (95{\%} CI: 78-.). The median survival was 72 months (95{\%} CI: 30–108 months). For patients with at least 3 years of follow-up, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival was 74{\%}, 59{\%}, and 50{\%}, respectively. Mortality was associated with higher AFP and lower Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI). Conclusion: Carefully selected elderly patients with sHCC appear to have unique disease that is amenable to hepatic resection with low morbidity and mortality with excellent overall and recurrence-free survival.",
author = "Zarour, {Luai R.} and Kevin Billingsley and Walker, {Brett S.} and Charles Enestvedt and Susan Orloff and Erin Maynard and Skye Mayo",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.01.030",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hepatic resection of solitary HCC in the elderly

T2 - A unique disease in a growing population

AU - Zarour, Luai R.

AU - Billingsley, Kevin

AU - Walker, Brett S.

AU - Enestvedt, Charles

AU - Orloff, Susan

AU - Maynard, Erin

AU - Mayo, Skye

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Management of elderly patients with solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (sHCC) is challenging with perceived clinicopathologic differences driving treatment options. We sought to determine factors predictive of disease control and survival after hepatic resection of sHCC in elderly patients. Methods: We identified n = 45 elderly patients (³≥65 yo) with sHCC treated with hepatic resection alone from our prospective database from 2003–16. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed and survival was assessed from the time of hepatic resection. Results: The median age was 75-years-old. Less than half of patients (47%) had viral hepatitis. At resection, the median Child-Pugh score was A6, median tumor size 5 cm, and mean AFP of 1050 (ng/mL). Major hepatectomy was performed in 23 patients (51%) with R0 resection achieved in 96%. Two patients (4%) had Grade III complications with no mortalities at 30 days and one death (2%) at 90-days. After R0 resection 44% (n = 20) had intrahepatic recurrence at a median of 32 months (95% CI: 15–46) with 20% (n = 9) developing extrahepatic recurrence at a median of 78 months (95% CI: 78-.). The median survival was 72 months (95% CI: 30–108 months). For patients with at least 3 years of follow-up, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival was 74%, 59%, and 50%, respectively. Mortality was associated with higher AFP and lower Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI). Conclusion: Carefully selected elderly patients with sHCC appear to have unique disease that is amenable to hepatic resection with low morbidity and mortality with excellent overall and recurrence-free survival.

AB - Background: Management of elderly patients with solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (sHCC) is challenging with perceived clinicopathologic differences driving treatment options. We sought to determine factors predictive of disease control and survival after hepatic resection of sHCC in elderly patients. Methods: We identified n = 45 elderly patients (³≥65 yo) with sHCC treated with hepatic resection alone from our prospective database from 2003–16. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed and survival was assessed from the time of hepatic resection. Results: The median age was 75-years-old. Less than half of patients (47%) had viral hepatitis. At resection, the median Child-Pugh score was A6, median tumor size 5 cm, and mean AFP of 1050 (ng/mL). Major hepatectomy was performed in 23 patients (51%) with R0 resection achieved in 96%. Two patients (4%) had Grade III complications with no mortalities at 30 days and one death (2%) at 90-days. After R0 resection 44% (n = 20) had intrahepatic recurrence at a median of 32 months (95% CI: 15–46) with 20% (n = 9) developing extrahepatic recurrence at a median of 78 months (95% CI: 78-.). The median survival was 72 months (95% CI: 30–108 months). For patients with at least 3 years of follow-up, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival was 74%, 59%, and 50%, respectively. Mortality was associated with higher AFP and lower Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI). Conclusion: Carefully selected elderly patients with sHCC appear to have unique disease that is amenable to hepatic resection with low morbidity and mortality with excellent overall and recurrence-free survival.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.01.030

DO - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.01.030

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JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

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