Health professionals' views on standards for decision-making capacity regarding refusal of medical treatment in mild Alzheimer's disease

Ladislav Volicer, Linda Ganzini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to determine which elements professionals consider important for evaluation of decision-making capacity. Survey with a vignette case report of an individual with mild dementia was mailed to four groups of individuals: 1. members of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, 2. chairs of Veterans Affairs (VA) Ethics Advisory Committees (EACs), 3. randomly selected geriatricians who were members of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA), and 4. randomly selected psychologists who were members of the GSA. Two hundred thirty-seven psychiatrists, 95 VA EAC chairs, 103 geriatricians, and 46 psychologists responded to this survey. The majority of the respondents endorsed all five basic elements as necessary for determination of decision-making capacity in the presented vignette, but only a minority of respondents endorsed all five basic elements, and a small proportion of respondents endorsed only one or two elements. The results indicate that physicians do not use uniform standards for assessment of decision-making capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1270-1274
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume51
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Treatment Refusal
Decision Making
Alzheimer Disease
Health
Ethics Committees
Veterans
Advisory Committees
Psychology
Psychosomatic Medicine
Psychiatry
Dementia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Physicians

Keywords

  • Decision-making capacity
  • Dementia
  • Ethical standards

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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