Health insurance expansion and incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

A pilot study in a US metropolitan community

Eric Stecker, Kyndaron Reinier, Carmen Rusinaru, Audrey Uy-Evanado, Jonathan Jui, Sumeet S. Chugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background-Health insurance has many benefits including improved financial security, greater access to preventive care, and better self-perceived health. However, the influence of health insurance on major health outcomes is unclear. Sudden cardiac arrest prevention represents one of the major potential benefits from health insurance, given the large impact of sudden cardiac arrest on premature death and its potential sensitivity to preventive care. Methods and Results-We conducted a pre-post study with control group examining out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) among adult residents ofMultnomah County,Oregon (2015 adult population 636 000). Two time periods surrounding implementation of the Affordable Care Actwere evaluated: 2011-2012 ("pre-expansion") and 2014-2015 ("postexpansion"). The change in OHCA incidence for the middleaged population (45-64 years old) exposed to insurance expansion was compared with the elderly population (age ≥65 years old) with constant near-universal coverage. Rates of OHCA among middle-aged individuals decreased from 102 per 100 000 (95% CI: 92-113 per 100 000) to 85 per 100 000 (95% CI: 76-94 per 100 000), P value 0.01. The elderly population experienced no change inOHCA incidence, with rates of 275 per 100 000 (95% CI: 250-300 per 100 000) and 269 per 100 000 (95% CI: 245-292 per 100 000), P value 0.70. Conclusions-Health insurance expansion was associated with a significant reduction in OHCA incidence. Based on this pilot study, further investigation in larger populations is warranted and feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere005667
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Health Insurance
Incidence
Preventive Medicine
Population
Sudden Cardiac Death
Universal Coverage
Premature Mortality
Health
Insurance
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Health policy
  • Healthcare access
  • Sudden cardiac arrest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Health insurance expansion and incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : A pilot study in a US metropolitan community. / Stecker, Eric; Reinier, Kyndaron; Rusinaru, Carmen; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 6, No. 7, e005667, 01.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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