Health beliefs of marshallese regarding type 2 diabetes

Pearl Anna McElfish, Emily Hallgren, L. Jean Henry, Mandy Ritok, Jellesen Rubon-Chutaro, Peter Kohler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The Marshallese population suffers from disproportionate rates of type 2 diabetes. This study identifies the underlying beliefs and perceptions that affect diabetes self-management behavior in the US Marshallese population living in Arkansas. Methods: The study employs focus groups with a semi-structured interview guide developed using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach and the Health Belief Model. Data were collected from 41 participants; bilingual community co-investigators provided translation as needed. Results: The results show high-perceived threat, with most participants describing diabetes as inevitable and a death sentence. Participants are generally unaware of the benefits of diabetes self-management behaviors, and the Marshallese population faces significant policy, environmental, and systems barriers to diabetes self-management. The primary cue to action is a diagnosis of diabetes, and there are varying levels of self-efficacy. Conclusions: The research grounded in the Health Belief Model provides important contributions that can help advance diabetes self-management efforts within Pacific Islander communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-257
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Care
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
chronic illness
Health
health
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environmental Policy
Population
management
Self Efficacy
Focus Groups
Cues
community
Research Personnel
Interviews
research approach
environmental policy
self-efficacy
Research
threat

Keywords

  • Community-based participatory research
  • Diabetes
  • Health disparities
  • Minority health
  • Pacific Islanders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

McElfish, P. A., Hallgren, E., Henry, L. J., Ritok, M., Rubon-Chutaro, J., & Kohler, P. (2016). Health beliefs of marshallese regarding type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Health Behavior, 40(2), 248-257. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.40.2.10

Health beliefs of marshallese regarding type 2 diabetes. / McElfish, Pearl Anna; Hallgren, Emily; Henry, L. Jean; Ritok, Mandy; Rubon-Chutaro, Jellesen; Kohler, Peter.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.03.2016, p. 248-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McElfish, PA, Hallgren, E, Henry, LJ, Ritok, M, Rubon-Chutaro, J & Kohler, P 2016, 'Health beliefs of marshallese regarding type 2 diabetes', American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 248-257. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.40.2.10
McElfish PA, Hallgren E, Henry LJ, Ritok M, Rubon-Chutaro J, Kohler P. Health beliefs of marshallese regarding type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Health Behavior. 2016 Mar 1;40(2):248-257. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.40.2.10
McElfish, Pearl Anna ; Hallgren, Emily ; Henry, L. Jean ; Ritok, Mandy ; Rubon-Chutaro, Jellesen ; Kohler, Peter. / Health beliefs of marshallese regarding type 2 diabetes. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. 248-257.
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