Growth and intellectual development

D. M. Wilson, L. D. Hammer, P. M. Duncan, S. M. Dornbusch, P. L. Ritter, R. L. Hintz, R. T. Gross, Ronald (Ron) Rosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data from the National Health Examination Survey (cycles II and III) provided a representative sample of 13,887 US youths (6 to 17 years of age) with which to examine the relationship between height (normalized for age and sex) and measures of intellectual development (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children) and academic achievement (Wide Range Achievement Test). Additionally, 2,177 subjects were studied first in cycle II and 2 to 5 years later in cycle III, forming a well-selected longitudinal study group in which to examine any association between linear growth and change in IQ scores. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children and Wide Range Achievement Test scores were significantly correlated with height in both cycle II and cycle III. However, no significant association between change in relative height and change in IQ scores could be detected in the longitudinal group. These data suggest that therapies designed to increase height are unlikely to alter measures of intellectual development or academic achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)646-650
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume78
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Growth and Development
Wechsler Scales
Intelligence
Health Surveys
Longitudinal Studies
Growth
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Wilson, D. M., Hammer, L. D., Duncan, P. M., Dornbusch, S. M., Ritter, P. L., Hintz, R. L., ... Rosenfeld, R. R. (1986). Growth and intellectual development. Pediatrics, 78(4), 646-650.

Growth and intellectual development. / Wilson, D. M.; Hammer, L. D.; Duncan, P. M.; Dornbusch, S. M.; Ritter, P. L.; Hintz, R. L.; Gross, R. T.; Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron).

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 78, No. 4, 1986, p. 646-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, DM, Hammer, LD, Duncan, PM, Dornbusch, SM, Ritter, PL, Hintz, RL, Gross, RT & Rosenfeld, RR 1986, 'Growth and intellectual development', Pediatrics, vol. 78, no. 4, pp. 646-650.
Wilson DM, Hammer LD, Duncan PM, Dornbusch SM, Ritter PL, Hintz RL et al. Growth and intellectual development. Pediatrics. 1986;78(4):646-650.
Wilson, D. M. ; Hammer, L. D. ; Duncan, P. M. ; Dornbusch, S. M. ; Ritter, P. L. ; Hintz, R. L. ; Gross, R. T. ; Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron). / Growth and intellectual development. In: Pediatrics. 1986 ; Vol. 78, No. 4. pp. 646-650.
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