Graduate training and the treatment of suicidal clients

The students' perspective

Elizabeth T. Dexter-Mazza, Kurt Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Existing literature suggests that graduate programs may not provide adequate training in working with suicidal clients. Therefore, we surveyed 238 predoctoral psychology interns and assessed the prevalence of clients engaging in suicidal behaviors and the amount of formal training in managing suicidal clients received. Results showed approximately 5% of participants indicated a client suicide and 99% indicated they had treated at least one suicidal client during their graduate training. In contrast, results demonstrated only 50% of the participants reported attending programs where formal training was offered. These findings suggest a continued need for increased formal training in managing suicidal clients in graduate psychology programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-218
Number of pages8
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Students
Psychology
Suicide
Education
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Graduate training and the treatment of suicidal clients : The students' perspective. / Dexter-Mazza, Elizabeth T.; Freeman, Kurt.

In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, Vol. 33, No. 2, 06.2003, p. 211-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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