Golgi targeting of human guanylate-binding protein-1 requires nucleotide binding, isoprenylation, and an IFN-γ-inducible cofactor

Nir Modiano, Yanping E. Lu, Peter Cresswell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human guanylate-binding protein-1 (hGBP-1) is a large GTPase, similar in structure to the dynamins. Like many smaller GTPases of the Ras/Rab family, it is farnesylated, suggesting it may dock into membranes and perhaps play a role in intracellular trafficking. To date, however, hGBP-1 has never been associated with a specific intracellular compartment. Here we present evidence that hGBP-1 can associate with the Golgi apparatus. Redistribution from the cytosol to the Golgi was observed by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation after aluminum fluoride treatment, suggesting that it occurs when hGBP-1 is in its GTP-bound state. Relocalization was blocked by a farnesyl transferase inhibitor. The C589S mutant of hGBP-1, which cannot be farnesylated, and the previously uncharacterized R48P mutant, which cannot bind GTP, both failed to localize to the Golgi. These two mutants had a dominant-negative effect, preventing endogenous wild-type hGBP-1 from efficiently redistributing after aluminum fluoride treatment. Furthermore, hGBP-1 requires another IFN-γ-induced factor to be targeted to the Golgi, because constitutively expressed hGBP-1 remained cytosolic in cells treated with aluminum fluoride unless the cells were preincubated with IFN-γ. Finally, two non-hydrolyzing mutants of hGBP-1, corresponding to active mutants of Ras family proteins, failed to constitutively associate with the Golgi; we propose three possible explanations for this surprising result.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8680-8685
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume102
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 14 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Prenylation
Nucleotides
Guanosine Triphosphate
Dynamins
human GBP1 protein
ras Proteins
Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins
GTP Phosphohydrolases
Golgi Apparatus
Transferases
Cytosol
Fluorescent Antibody Technique

Keywords

  • Antiviral proteins
  • GTpases
  • Innate immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

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title = "Golgi targeting of human guanylate-binding protein-1 requires nucleotide binding, isoprenylation, and an IFN-γ-inducible cofactor",
abstract = "Human guanylate-binding protein-1 (hGBP-1) is a large GTPase, similar in structure to the dynamins. Like many smaller GTPases of the Ras/Rab family, it is farnesylated, suggesting it may dock into membranes and perhaps play a role in intracellular trafficking. To date, however, hGBP-1 has never been associated with a specific intracellular compartment. Here we present evidence that hGBP-1 can associate with the Golgi apparatus. Redistribution from the cytosol to the Golgi was observed by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation after aluminum fluoride treatment, suggesting that it occurs when hGBP-1 is in its GTP-bound state. Relocalization was blocked by a farnesyl transferase inhibitor. The C589S mutant of hGBP-1, which cannot be farnesylated, and the previously uncharacterized R48P mutant, which cannot bind GTP, both failed to localize to the Golgi. These two mutants had a dominant-negative effect, preventing endogenous wild-type hGBP-1 from efficiently redistributing after aluminum fluoride treatment. Furthermore, hGBP-1 requires another IFN-γ-induced factor to be targeted to the Golgi, because constitutively expressed hGBP-1 remained cytosolic in cells treated with aluminum fluoride unless the cells were preincubated with IFN-γ. Finally, two non-hydrolyzing mutants of hGBP-1, corresponding to active mutants of Ras family proteins, failed to constitutively associate with the Golgi; we propose three possible explanations for this surprising result.",
keywords = "Antiviral proteins, GTpases, Innate immunity",
author = "Nir Modiano and Lu, {Yanping E.} and Peter Cresswell",
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T1 - Golgi targeting of human guanylate-binding protein-1 requires nucleotide binding, isoprenylation, and an IFN-γ-inducible cofactor

AU - Modiano, Nir

AU - Lu, Yanping E.

AU - Cresswell, Peter

PY - 2005/6/14

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N2 - Human guanylate-binding protein-1 (hGBP-1) is a large GTPase, similar in structure to the dynamins. Like many smaller GTPases of the Ras/Rab family, it is farnesylated, suggesting it may dock into membranes and perhaps play a role in intracellular trafficking. To date, however, hGBP-1 has never been associated with a specific intracellular compartment. Here we present evidence that hGBP-1 can associate with the Golgi apparatus. Redistribution from the cytosol to the Golgi was observed by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation after aluminum fluoride treatment, suggesting that it occurs when hGBP-1 is in its GTP-bound state. Relocalization was blocked by a farnesyl transferase inhibitor. The C589S mutant of hGBP-1, which cannot be farnesylated, and the previously uncharacterized R48P mutant, which cannot bind GTP, both failed to localize to the Golgi. These two mutants had a dominant-negative effect, preventing endogenous wild-type hGBP-1 from efficiently redistributing after aluminum fluoride treatment. Furthermore, hGBP-1 requires another IFN-γ-induced factor to be targeted to the Golgi, because constitutively expressed hGBP-1 remained cytosolic in cells treated with aluminum fluoride unless the cells were preincubated with IFN-γ. Finally, two non-hydrolyzing mutants of hGBP-1, corresponding to active mutants of Ras family proteins, failed to constitutively associate with the Golgi; we propose three possible explanations for this surprising result.

AB - Human guanylate-binding protein-1 (hGBP-1) is a large GTPase, similar in structure to the dynamins. Like many smaller GTPases of the Ras/Rab family, it is farnesylated, suggesting it may dock into membranes and perhaps play a role in intracellular trafficking. To date, however, hGBP-1 has never been associated with a specific intracellular compartment. Here we present evidence that hGBP-1 can associate with the Golgi apparatus. Redistribution from the cytosol to the Golgi was observed by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation after aluminum fluoride treatment, suggesting that it occurs when hGBP-1 is in its GTP-bound state. Relocalization was blocked by a farnesyl transferase inhibitor. The C589S mutant of hGBP-1, which cannot be farnesylated, and the previously uncharacterized R48P mutant, which cannot bind GTP, both failed to localize to the Golgi. These two mutants had a dominant-negative effect, preventing endogenous wild-type hGBP-1 from efficiently redistributing after aluminum fluoride treatment. Furthermore, hGBP-1 requires another IFN-γ-induced factor to be targeted to the Golgi, because constitutively expressed hGBP-1 remained cytosolic in cells treated with aluminum fluoride unless the cells were preincubated with IFN-γ. Finally, two non-hydrolyzing mutants of hGBP-1, corresponding to active mutants of Ras family proteins, failed to constitutively associate with the Golgi; we propose three possible explanations for this surprising result.

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