Glutamatergic antagonists attenuate ability of dopamine uptake blockers to increase extracellular levels of dopamine: Implications for tonic influence of glutamate on dopamine release

Bita Moghaddam, Maria L. Bolinao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous in vivo studies reporting a dose‐dependent increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels by excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonists have been interpreted to indicate a lack of tonic excitatory effect exerted by these amino acids on striatal DA release. Alternatively, a tonic excitatory influence on DA release may affect a small fraction of DA terminals, so that blockade of this effect does not make a great enough contribution to the extracellular fluid to be detected by microdialysis. To examine this possibility, the effect of EAA antagonists was assessed by microdialysis in the presence of DA uptake blockers. It was found that in the presence of nomifensine or cocaine, antagonists of either NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptors decreased extracellular DA levels in the striatum. These data suggest that EAAs may exert a tonic facilitatory influence on striatal DA release and/or that endogenous EAAs may potentiate the action of DA uptake blockers through mechanisms that are mediated by EAA receptors. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-342
Number of pages6
JournalSynapse
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dopamine Antagonists
Glutamic Acid
Dopamine
Corpus Striatum
Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists
Microdialysis
Nomifensine
Kainic Acid Receptors
AMPA Receptors
Extracellular Fluid
Glutamate Receptors
N-Methylaspartate
Cocaine
Amino Acids

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • Cocaine
  • Dopamine release
  • Dopamine uptake
  • Glutamate
  • Microdialysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "Glutamatergic antagonists attenuate ability of dopamine uptake blockers to increase extracellular levels of dopamine: Implications for tonic influence of glutamate on dopamine release",
abstract = "Previous in vivo studies reporting a dose‐dependent increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels by excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonists have been interpreted to indicate a lack of tonic excitatory effect exerted by these amino acids on striatal DA release. Alternatively, a tonic excitatory influence on DA release may affect a small fraction of DA terminals, so that blockade of this effect does not make a great enough contribution to the extracellular fluid to be detected by microdialysis. To examine this possibility, the effect of EAA antagonists was assessed by microdialysis in the presence of DA uptake blockers. It was found that in the presence of nomifensine or cocaine, antagonists of either NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptors decreased extracellular DA levels in the striatum. These data suggest that EAAs may exert a tonic facilitatory influence on striatal DA release and/or that endogenous EAAs may potentiate the action of DA uptake blockers through mechanisms that are mediated by EAA receptors. {\circledC} 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.",
keywords = "Anesthesia, Cocaine, Dopamine release, Dopamine uptake, Glutamate, Microdialysis",
author = "Bita Moghaddam and Bolinao, {Maria L.}",
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T2 - Implications for tonic influence of glutamate on dopamine release

AU - Moghaddam, Bita

AU - Bolinao, Maria L.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Previous in vivo studies reporting a dose‐dependent increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels by excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonists have been interpreted to indicate a lack of tonic excitatory effect exerted by these amino acids on striatal DA release. Alternatively, a tonic excitatory influence on DA release may affect a small fraction of DA terminals, so that blockade of this effect does not make a great enough contribution to the extracellular fluid to be detected by microdialysis. To examine this possibility, the effect of EAA antagonists was assessed by microdialysis in the presence of DA uptake blockers. It was found that in the presence of nomifensine or cocaine, antagonists of either NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptors decreased extracellular DA levels in the striatum. These data suggest that EAAs may exert a tonic facilitatory influence on striatal DA release and/or that endogenous EAAs may potentiate the action of DA uptake blockers through mechanisms that are mediated by EAA receptors. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

AB - Previous in vivo studies reporting a dose‐dependent increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels by excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonists have been interpreted to indicate a lack of tonic excitatory effect exerted by these amino acids on striatal DA release. Alternatively, a tonic excitatory influence on DA release may affect a small fraction of DA terminals, so that blockade of this effect does not make a great enough contribution to the extracellular fluid to be detected by microdialysis. To examine this possibility, the effect of EAA antagonists was assessed by microdialysis in the presence of DA uptake blockers. It was found that in the presence of nomifensine or cocaine, antagonists of either NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptors decreased extracellular DA levels in the striatum. These data suggest that EAAs may exert a tonic facilitatory influence on striatal DA release and/or that endogenous EAAs may potentiate the action of DA uptake blockers through mechanisms that are mediated by EAA receptors. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

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