Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery: A Model of Global Collaboration to Advance the Surgical Care of Children

Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recommendations by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery regarding surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) require development to address the needs of children. The Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery (GICS) was founded in 2016 to identify solutions to problems in children’s surgery by utilizing the expertise of practitioners from around the world. This report details this unique process and underlying principles. Methods: Three global meetings convened providers of surgical services for children. Through working group meetings, participants reviewed the status of global children’s surgery to develop priorities and identify necessary resources for implementation. Working groups were formed under LMIC leadership to address specific priorities. By creating networking opportunities, GICS has promoted the development of LMIC-LMIC and HIC-LMIC partnerships. Results: GICS members identified priorities for children’s surgical care within four pillars: infrastructure, service delivery, training and research. Guidelines for provision of care at every healthcare level based on these pillars were created. Seventeen subspecialty, LMIC chaired working groups developed the Optimal Resources for Children’s Surgery (OReCS) document. The guidelines are stratified by subspecialty and level of health care: primary health center, first-, second- and third-level hospitals, and the national children’s hospital. The OReCS document delineates the personnel, equipment, facilities, procedures, training, research and quality improvement components at all levels of care. Conclusion: Worldwide collaboration with leadership by providers from LMICs holds the promise of improving children’s surgical care. GICS will continue to evolve in order to achieve the vision of safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld journal of surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Child Care
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Group Processes
Quality Improvement
Research
Health Status
Equipment and Supplies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery : A Model of Global Collaboration to Advance the Surgical Care of Children. / Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery.

In: World journal of surgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery: A Model of Global Collaboration to Advance the Surgical Care of Children",
abstract = "Background: Recommendations by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery regarding surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) require development to address the needs of children. The Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery (GICS) was founded in 2016 to identify solutions to problems in children’s surgery by utilizing the expertise of practitioners from around the world. This report details this unique process and underlying principles. Methods: Three global meetings convened providers of surgical services for children. Through working group meetings, participants reviewed the status of global children’s surgery to develop priorities and identify necessary resources for implementation. Working groups were formed under LMIC leadership to address specific priorities. By creating networking opportunities, GICS has promoted the development of LMIC-LMIC and HIC-LMIC partnerships. Results: GICS members identified priorities for children’s surgical care within four pillars: infrastructure, service delivery, training and research. Guidelines for provision of care at every healthcare level based on these pillars were created. Seventeen subspecialty, LMIC chaired working groups developed the Optimal Resources for Children’s Surgery (OReCS) document. The guidelines are stratified by subspecialty and level of health care: primary health center, first-, second- and third-level hospitals, and the national children’s hospital. The OReCS document delineates the personnel, equipment, facilities, procedures, training, research and quality improvement components at all levels of care. Conclusion: Worldwide collaboration with leadership by providers from LMICs holds the promise of improving children’s surgical care. GICS will continue to evolve in order to achieve the vision of safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all children.",
author = "{Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery} and Naomi Wright and Guy Jensen and Etienne St-Louis and David Grabski and Yasmine Yousef and Neema Kaseje and Laura Goodman and Jamie Anderson and Emmanuel Ameh and Tahmina Banu and Stephen Bickler and Marilyn Butler and Michael Cooper and Zipporah Gathuya and Patrick Kamalo and Bertille Ki and Rashmi Kumar and Vrisha Madhuri and Keith Oldham and Doruk Ozgediz and Dan Poenaru and John Sekabira and {Salda{\~n}a Gallo}, Lily and Sabina Siddiqui and Benjamin Yapo and Abantanga, {Francis A.} and Mohamed Abdelmalak and Nurudeen Abdulraheem and Niyi Ade-Ajayi and Ismail, {Edna Adan} and Adesoji Ademuyiwa and Eltayeb Ahmed and Sunday Ajike and Akintububo, {Olugbemi Benedict} and Felix Alakaloko and Brendan Allen and Vanda Amado and Shanthi Anbuselvan and Anyomih, {Theophilus Teddy Kojo} and Leopold Asakpa and Gudeta Assegie and Jason Axt and Ruben Ayala and Frehun Ayele and Bal, {Harshjeet Singh} and Rouma Bankole and Tim Beacon and Zaitun Bokhari and Borah, {Hiranya Kumar} and Eric Borgstein",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
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language = "English (US)",
journal = "World Journal of Surgery",
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AU - Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery

AU - Wright, Naomi

AU - Jensen, Guy

AU - St-Louis, Etienne

AU - Grabski, David

AU - Yousef, Yasmine

AU - Kaseje, Neema

AU - Goodman, Laura

AU - Anderson, Jamie

AU - Ameh, Emmanuel

AU - Banu, Tahmina

AU - Bickler, Stephen

AU - Butler, Marilyn

AU - Cooper, Michael

AU - Gathuya, Zipporah

AU - Kamalo, Patrick

AU - Ki, Bertille

AU - Kumar, Rashmi

AU - Madhuri, Vrisha

AU - Oldham, Keith

AU - Ozgediz, Doruk

AU - Poenaru, Dan

AU - Sekabira, John

AU - Saldaña Gallo, Lily

AU - Siddiqui, Sabina

AU - Yapo, Benjamin

AU - Abantanga, Francis A.

AU - Abdelmalak, Mohamed

AU - Abdulraheem, Nurudeen

AU - Ade-Ajayi, Niyi

AU - Ismail, Edna Adan

AU - Ademuyiwa, Adesoji

AU - Ahmed, Eltayeb

AU - Ajike, Sunday

AU - Akintububo, Olugbemi Benedict

AU - Alakaloko, Felix

AU - Allen, Brendan

AU - Amado, Vanda

AU - Anbuselvan, Shanthi

AU - Anyomih, Theophilus Teddy Kojo

AU - Asakpa, Leopold

AU - Assegie, Gudeta

AU - Axt, Jason

AU - Ayala, Ruben

AU - Ayele, Frehun

AU - Bal, Harshjeet Singh

AU - Bankole, Rouma

AU - Beacon, Tim

AU - Bokhari, Zaitun

AU - Borah, Hiranya Kumar

AU - Borgstein, Eric

PY - 2019/1/1

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N2 - Background: Recommendations by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery regarding surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) require development to address the needs of children. The Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery (GICS) was founded in 2016 to identify solutions to problems in children’s surgery by utilizing the expertise of practitioners from around the world. This report details this unique process and underlying principles. Methods: Three global meetings convened providers of surgical services for children. Through working group meetings, participants reviewed the status of global children’s surgery to develop priorities and identify necessary resources for implementation. Working groups were formed under LMIC leadership to address specific priorities. By creating networking opportunities, GICS has promoted the development of LMIC-LMIC and HIC-LMIC partnerships. Results: GICS members identified priorities for children’s surgical care within four pillars: infrastructure, service delivery, training and research. Guidelines for provision of care at every healthcare level based on these pillars were created. Seventeen subspecialty, LMIC chaired working groups developed the Optimal Resources for Children’s Surgery (OReCS) document. The guidelines are stratified by subspecialty and level of health care: primary health center, first-, second- and third-level hospitals, and the national children’s hospital. The OReCS document delineates the personnel, equipment, facilities, procedures, training, research and quality improvement components at all levels of care. Conclusion: Worldwide collaboration with leadership by providers from LMICs holds the promise of improving children’s surgical care. GICS will continue to evolve in order to achieve the vision of safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all children.

AB - Background: Recommendations by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery regarding surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) require development to address the needs of children. The Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery (GICS) was founded in 2016 to identify solutions to problems in children’s surgery by utilizing the expertise of practitioners from around the world. This report details this unique process and underlying principles. Methods: Three global meetings convened providers of surgical services for children. Through working group meetings, participants reviewed the status of global children’s surgery to develop priorities and identify necessary resources for implementation. Working groups were formed under LMIC leadership to address specific priorities. By creating networking opportunities, GICS has promoted the development of LMIC-LMIC and HIC-LMIC partnerships. Results: GICS members identified priorities for children’s surgical care within four pillars: infrastructure, service delivery, training and research. Guidelines for provision of care at every healthcare level based on these pillars were created. Seventeen subspecialty, LMIC chaired working groups developed the Optimal Resources for Children’s Surgery (OReCS) document. The guidelines are stratified by subspecialty and level of health care: primary health center, first-, second- and third-level hospitals, and the national children’s hospital. The OReCS document delineates the personnel, equipment, facilities, procedures, training, research and quality improvement components at all levels of care. Conclusion: Worldwide collaboration with leadership by providers from LMICs holds the promise of improving children’s surgical care. GICS will continue to evolve in order to achieve the vision of safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all children.

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