GIRK Channels

A Potential Link Between Learning and Addiction

Megan E. Tipps, Kari Buck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of drug-associated cues to reinitiate drug craving and seeking, even after long periods of abstinence, has led to the hypothesis that addiction represents a form of pathological learning, in which drugs of abuse hijack normal learning and memory processes to support long-term addictive behaviors. In this chapter, we review evidence suggesting that G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK/Kir3) channels are one mechanism through which numerous drugs of abuse can modulate learning and memory processes. We will examine the role of GIRK channels in two forms of experience-dependent long-term changes in neuronal function: homeostatic plasticity and synaptic plasticity. We will also discuss how drug-induced changes in GIRK-mediated signaling can lead to changes that support the development and maintenance of addiction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Review of Neurobiology
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages239-277
Number of pages39
Volume123
ISBN (Print)9780128024584
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Publication series

NameInternational Review of Neurobiology
Volume123
ISSN (Print)00747742

Fingerprint

G Protein-Coupled Inwardly-Rectifying Potassium Channels
Learning
Street Drugs
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Addictive Behavior
Neuronal Plasticity
Aptitude
GTP-Binding Proteins
Cues
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Depotentiation
  • GIRK
  • Homeostatic plasticity
  • Kir3
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Tipps, M. E., & Buck, K. (2015). GIRK Channels: A Potential Link Between Learning and Addiction. In International Review of Neurobiology (Vol. 123, pp. 239-277). (International Review of Neurobiology; Vol. 123). Academic Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.irn.2015.05.012

GIRK Channels : A Potential Link Between Learning and Addiction. / Tipps, Megan E.; Buck, Kari.

International Review of Neurobiology. Vol. 123 Academic Press Inc., 2015. p. 239-277 (International Review of Neurobiology; Vol. 123).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tipps, ME & Buck, K 2015, GIRK Channels: A Potential Link Between Learning and Addiction. in International Review of Neurobiology. vol. 123, International Review of Neurobiology, vol. 123, Academic Press Inc., pp. 239-277. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.irn.2015.05.012
Tipps ME, Buck K. GIRK Channels: A Potential Link Between Learning and Addiction. In International Review of Neurobiology. Vol. 123. Academic Press Inc. 2015. p. 239-277. (International Review of Neurobiology). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.irn.2015.05.012
Tipps, Megan E. ; Buck, Kari. / GIRK Channels : A Potential Link Between Learning and Addiction. International Review of Neurobiology. Vol. 123 Academic Press Inc., 2015. pp. 239-277 (International Review of Neurobiology).
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