Gestational age-specific neonatal morbidity among pregnancies complicated by advanced maternal age: A population-based retrospective cohort study

Amy M. Valent, Tondra Newman, Aimin Chen, Amy Thompson, Emily Defranco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Compare significant neonatal morbidity frequency differences in advanced maternal age (AMA) versus non-AMA pregnancies, assessing which gestational week is associated with the lowest morbidity risk.Methods: Population-based retrospective cohort study. Adverse neonatal outcome frequency differences were stratified by each week of gestation. Multivariate logistic regression estimated the relative risk (RR) of composite neonatal morbidity for women aged 35-39, 40-44, 45-49 and 50-55 versus 18-34 years, adjusted sequentially for relevant risk factors.Results: Neonatal morbidity decreased with each advancing week of term gestation, lowest at 39 weeks for all the groups. Adverse neonatal outcome risk for births to AMA women increased at 40 weeks: 35-39 years adjRR 1.12 [1.01-1.24] and ≥40 years 1.24 [1.01-1.52]. Each older maternal age category had increased risk for overall neonatal morbidity: 35-39 years adjRR 1.11 [95% CI 1.08-1.15], 40-44 years 1.21 [95% CI 1.14-1.29] and 45-49 years 1.34 [95% CI 1.05-1.69].Conclusions: Lowest neonatal morbidity risk is at 39-week gestation with a significantly increased risk observed thereafter, especially in women ≥40 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1485-1490
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Advanced maternal age
  • adverse neonatal outcomes
  • gestational week of delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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