Genome-wide analysis of t cell responses during acute and latent simian varicella virus infections in rhesus macaques

Kristen Haberthur, Aubrey Kraft, Nicole Arnold, Byung Park, Christine Meyer, Mark Asquith, Jesse Dewane, Ilhem Messaoudi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiological agent of varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (HZ [shingles]). Clinical observa- tions suggest that VZV-specific T cell immunity plays a more critical role than humoral immunity in the prevention of VZV reac- tivation and development of herpes zoster. Although numerous studies have characterized T cell responses directed against se-lect VZV open reading frames (ORFs), a comprehensive analysis of the T cell response to the entire VZV genome has not yet been conducted. We have recently shown that intrabronchial inoculation of young rhesus macaques with simian varicella virus (SVV), a homolog of VZV, recapitulates the hallmarks of acute and latent VZV infection in humans. In this study, we character- ized the specificity of T cell responses during acute and latent SVV infection. Animals generated a robust and broad T cell re-sponse directed against both structural and nonstructural viral proteins during acute infection in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and peripheral blood. During latency, T cell responses were detected only in the BAL fluid and were lower and more re-stricted than those observed during acute infection. Interestingly, we identified a small set of ORFs that were immunogenic dur- ing both acute and latent infection in the BAL fluid. Given the close genome relatedness of SVV and VZV, our studies highlight immunogenic ORFs that may be further investigated as potential components of novel VZV vaccines that specifically boost T cell immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11751-11761
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume87
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Cercopithecine herpesvirus 9
Human herpesvirus 3
Human Herpesvirus 3
Chickenpox
Virus Diseases
Macaca mulatta
Genome
T-lymphocytes
genome
infection
T-Lymphocytes
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Herpes Zoster
cells
Open Reading Frames
open reading frames
Immunity
Viral Nonstructural Proteins
Herpes Zoster Vaccine
immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Genome-wide analysis of t cell responses during acute and latent simian varicella virus infections in rhesus macaques. / Haberthur, Kristen; Kraft, Aubrey; Arnold, Nicole; Park, Byung; Meyer, Christine; Asquith, Mark; Dewane, Jesse; Messaoudi, Ilhem.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 87, No. 21, 2013, p. 11751-11761.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haberthur, Kristen ; Kraft, Aubrey ; Arnold, Nicole ; Park, Byung ; Meyer, Christine ; Asquith, Mark ; Dewane, Jesse ; Messaoudi, Ilhem. / Genome-wide analysis of t cell responses during acute and latent simian varicella virus infections in rhesus macaques. In: Journal of Virology. 2013 ; Vol. 87, No. 21. pp. 11751-11761.
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