Genital warts - A sexually transmitted disease (STD) epidemic?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections have been recognized as a sexually transmitted disease for centuries, yet data reflecting the magnitude of this problem are limited. Some recently compiled data from national surveys of private physicians, from United States population-based studies, and from STD clinics worldwide show that genital HPV infections are probably the most common of all the sexually transmissible viral diseases. The oncogenic potential of HPV in the genital tract((1-4)) is one reason for the growing concern over HPV, especially given its wide distribution, and it has stimulated interest in fundamental epidemiologic questions about the HPV disease spectrum. To project the magnitude of the HPV problem more clearly, I will summarize published reports and then present recently compiled demographic data from patients in a sexually transmitted disease clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-197
Number of pages5
JournalColposcopy and Gynecologic Laser Surgery
Volume1
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Condylomata Acuminata
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Papillomavirus Infections
Virus Diseases
Demography
Physicians
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Genital warts - A sexually transmitted disease (STD) epidemic? / Becker, Thomas.

In: Colposcopy and Gynecologic Laser Surgery, Vol. 1, No. 3, 1984, p. 193-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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