Genistein inhibits matrix metalloproteinase type 2 activation and prostate cancer cell invasion by blocking the transforming growth factor β-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2-27-kDa heat shock protein pathway

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Abstract

Genistein is a candidate cancer chemopreventive drug being tested in clinical trials. We have shown that genistein blocks prostate cancer (PCa) cell invasion, that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates activation of matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP-2) and cell invasion, and that genistein prevents transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) from activating p38 MAP kinase. More recently, we identified MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) and the 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) as downstream regulators of p38 MAP kinase. However, MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 can be regulated by factors other than p38 MAP kinase, and HSP27 is up-regulated during PCa progression. The current study was undertaken to examine the role of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 in modulating genistein-mediated regulation of PCa cell invasion. Genistein inhibited TGFβ-mediated phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27. Inhibitory effects by genistein upon cell signaling, inhibition of MMP-2, and inhibition of invasion were retained when both PC3 and PC3-M cells were transfected with either wildtype MAPKAPK2 or HSP27. However, transfection with dominant-negative MAPKAPK2 or nonphosphorylatable mutant HSP27 led to decreases in cell invasion and to abrogation of responsiveness to either TGFβ-mediated increases or genistein-mediated decreases in MMP-2 and cell invasion. It is noteworthy that, after transfection with constitutive active MAPKAPK2 or with pseudophosphorylated HSP27, levels of MMP-2 activation and cell invasion were high and overcame any inhibitory effect of genistein. These findings demonstrate that genistein-mediated inhibition of cell invasion rests upon blocking activation of the MAPKAPK2-HSP27 pathway, and that its activation during cancer progression has the potential to mitigate therapeutic efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)869-877
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Pharmacology
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

HSP27 Heat-Shock Proteins
Genistein
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
Transforming Growth Factors
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Protein Kinases
Prostatic Neoplasms
p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Transfection
MAP-kinase-activated kinase 2
Neoplasms
Phosphorylation
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Genistein inhibits matrix metalloproteinase type 2 activation and prostate cancer cell invasion by blocking the transforming growth factor β-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2-27-kDa heat shock protein pathway",
abstract = "Genistein is a candidate cancer chemopreventive drug being tested in clinical trials. We have shown that genistein blocks prostate cancer (PCa) cell invasion, that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates activation of matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP-2) and cell invasion, and that genistein prevents transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) from activating p38 MAP kinase. More recently, we identified MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) and the 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) as downstream regulators of p38 MAP kinase. However, MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 can be regulated by factors other than p38 MAP kinase, and HSP27 is up-regulated during PCa progression. The current study was undertaken to examine the role of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 in modulating genistein-mediated regulation of PCa cell invasion. Genistein inhibited TGFβ-mediated phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27. Inhibitory effects by genistein upon cell signaling, inhibition of MMP-2, and inhibition of invasion were retained when both PC3 and PC3-M cells were transfected with either wildtype MAPKAPK2 or HSP27. However, transfection with dominant-negative MAPKAPK2 or nonphosphorylatable mutant HSP27 led to decreases in cell invasion and to abrogation of responsiveness to either TGFβ-mediated increases or genistein-mediated decreases in MMP-2 and cell invasion. It is noteworthy that, after transfection with constitutive active MAPKAPK2 or with pseudophosphorylated HSP27, levels of MMP-2 activation and cell invasion were high and overcame any inhibitory effect of genistein. These findings demonstrate that genistein-mediated inhibition of cell invasion rests upon blocking activation of the MAPKAPK2-HSP27 pathway, and that its activation during cancer progression has the potential to mitigate therapeutic efficacy.",
author = "Li Xu and Raymond Bergan",
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T1 - Genistein inhibits matrix metalloproteinase type 2 activation and prostate cancer cell invasion by blocking the transforming growth factor β-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2-27-kDa heat shock protein pathway

AU - Xu, Li

AU - Bergan, Raymond

PY - 2006

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N2 - Genistein is a candidate cancer chemopreventive drug being tested in clinical trials. We have shown that genistein blocks prostate cancer (PCa) cell invasion, that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates activation of matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP-2) and cell invasion, and that genistein prevents transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) from activating p38 MAP kinase. More recently, we identified MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) and the 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) as downstream regulators of p38 MAP kinase. However, MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 can be regulated by factors other than p38 MAP kinase, and HSP27 is up-regulated during PCa progression. The current study was undertaken to examine the role of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 in modulating genistein-mediated regulation of PCa cell invasion. Genistein inhibited TGFβ-mediated phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27. Inhibitory effects by genistein upon cell signaling, inhibition of MMP-2, and inhibition of invasion were retained when both PC3 and PC3-M cells were transfected with either wildtype MAPKAPK2 or HSP27. However, transfection with dominant-negative MAPKAPK2 or nonphosphorylatable mutant HSP27 led to decreases in cell invasion and to abrogation of responsiveness to either TGFβ-mediated increases or genistein-mediated decreases in MMP-2 and cell invasion. It is noteworthy that, after transfection with constitutive active MAPKAPK2 or with pseudophosphorylated HSP27, levels of MMP-2 activation and cell invasion were high and overcame any inhibitory effect of genistein. These findings demonstrate that genistein-mediated inhibition of cell invasion rests upon blocking activation of the MAPKAPK2-HSP27 pathway, and that its activation during cancer progression has the potential to mitigate therapeutic efficacy.

AB - Genistein is a candidate cancer chemopreventive drug being tested in clinical trials. We have shown that genistein blocks prostate cancer (PCa) cell invasion, that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates activation of matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP-2) and cell invasion, and that genistein prevents transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) from activating p38 MAP kinase. More recently, we identified MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) and the 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) as downstream regulators of p38 MAP kinase. However, MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 can be regulated by factors other than p38 MAP kinase, and HSP27 is up-regulated during PCa progression. The current study was undertaken to examine the role of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27 in modulating genistein-mediated regulation of PCa cell invasion. Genistein inhibited TGFβ-mediated phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and HSP27. Inhibitory effects by genistein upon cell signaling, inhibition of MMP-2, and inhibition of invasion were retained when both PC3 and PC3-M cells were transfected with either wildtype MAPKAPK2 or HSP27. However, transfection with dominant-negative MAPKAPK2 or nonphosphorylatable mutant HSP27 led to decreases in cell invasion and to abrogation of responsiveness to either TGFβ-mediated increases or genistein-mediated decreases in MMP-2 and cell invasion. It is noteworthy that, after transfection with constitutive active MAPKAPK2 or with pseudophosphorylated HSP27, levels of MMP-2 activation and cell invasion were high and overcame any inhibitory effect of genistein. These findings demonstrate that genistein-mediated inhibition of cell invasion rests upon blocking activation of the MAPKAPK2-HSP27 pathway, and that its activation during cancer progression has the potential to mitigate therapeutic efficacy.

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