Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure

A. Malhotra, G. Pillar, R. B. Fogel, J. Beauregard, J. K. Edwards, D. I. Slamowitz, Steven Shea, D. P. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The stimuli controlling pharyngeal dilator muscles are poorly defined. Local mechanoreceptors are a leading possibility. To address this, we assessed the relationship between two dilator muscle electromyograms (EMGs, i.e., genioglossus [GG - An inspiratory phasic muscle], tensor palatini [TP - A tonically active muscle]) and potential stimuli (i.e., epiglottic pressure [Pepi], airflow [V̇], and pharyngeal resistance [Rpha]). Fifteen normal subjects were studied, during wakefulness and stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The GGEMG and TPEMG were assessed during basal breathing and during inspiratory resistive loading (four loads, done in triplicate), while quantifying Pepi and choanal pressures (Pcho, Millar catheters) plus V̇. There was a strong correlation between Pepi and GGEMG during wakefulness in most subjects (9 of 15 had absolute R > 0.7 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.62, p <0.05). These correlations were less robust during NREM sleep (8 of 15 absolute R > 0.6 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.39, ns). The slope of the Pepi versus GGEMG relationship was greater during wakefulness than sleep (-0.67 versus -0.39% max/cm H2O, p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between TPEMG and any of the measured potential stimuli. We conclude that intrapharyngeal pressure may modulate genioglossus activity during wakefulness, with a fall in muscle responsiveness during sleep. The activity of the TP was not clearly influenced by any measured local stimulus either awake or asleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1058-1062
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume162
Issue number3 I
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Palatal Muscles
Wakefulness
Pressure
Muscles
Sleep
Pharyngeal Muscles
Mechanoreceptors
Electromyography
Eye Movements
Respiration
Catheters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Malhotra, A., Pillar, G., Fogel, R. B., Beauregard, J., Edwards, J. K., Slamowitz, D. I., ... White, D. P. (2000). Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 162(3 I), 1058-1062.

Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure. / Malhotra, A.; Pillar, G.; Fogel, R. B.; Beauregard, J.; Edwards, J. K.; Slamowitz, D. I.; Shea, Steven; White, D. P.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 162, No. 3 I, 2000, p. 1058-1062.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malhotra, A, Pillar, G, Fogel, RB, Beauregard, J, Edwards, JK, Slamowitz, DI, Shea, S & White, DP 2000, 'Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 162, no. 3 I, pp. 1058-1062.
Malhotra A, Pillar G, Fogel RB, Beauregard J, Edwards JK, Slamowitz DI et al. Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2000;162(3 I):1058-1062.
Malhotra, A. ; Pillar, G. ; Fogel, R. B. ; Beauregard, J. ; Edwards, J. K. ; Slamowitz, D. I. ; Shea, Steven ; White, D. P. / Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 162, No. 3 I. pp. 1058-1062.
@article{15a973860a27427797e8552dc3e839c5,
title = "Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure",
abstract = "The stimuli controlling pharyngeal dilator muscles are poorly defined. Local mechanoreceptors are a leading possibility. To address this, we assessed the relationship between two dilator muscle electromyograms (EMGs, i.e., genioglossus [GG - An inspiratory phasic muscle], tensor palatini [TP - A tonically active muscle]) and potential stimuli (i.e., epiglottic pressure [Pepi], airflow [V̇], and pharyngeal resistance [Rpha]). Fifteen normal subjects were studied, during wakefulness and stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The GGEMG and TPEMG were assessed during basal breathing and during inspiratory resistive loading (four loads, done in triplicate), while quantifying Pepi and choanal pressures (Pcho, Millar catheters) plus V̇. There was a strong correlation between Pepi and GGEMG during wakefulness in most subjects (9 of 15 had absolute R > 0.7 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.62, p <0.05). These correlations were less robust during NREM sleep (8 of 15 absolute R > 0.6 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.39, ns). The slope of the Pepi versus GGEMG relationship was greater during wakefulness than sleep (-0.67 versus -0.39{\%} max/cm H2O, p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between TPEMG and any of the measured potential stimuli. We conclude that intrapharyngeal pressure may modulate genioglossus activity during wakefulness, with a fall in muscle responsiveness during sleep. The activity of the TP was not clearly influenced by any measured local stimulus either awake or asleep.",
author = "A. Malhotra and G. Pillar and Fogel, {R. B.} and J. Beauregard and Edwards, {J. K.} and Slamowitz, {D. I.} and Steven Shea and White, {D. P.}",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "162",
pages = "1058--1062",
journal = "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "1073-449X",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society",
number = "3 I",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genioglossal but not palatal muscle activity relates closely to pharyngeal pressure

AU - Malhotra, A.

AU - Pillar, G.

AU - Fogel, R. B.

AU - Beauregard, J.

AU - Edwards, J. K.

AU - Slamowitz, D. I.

AU - Shea, Steven

AU - White, D. P.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - The stimuli controlling pharyngeal dilator muscles are poorly defined. Local mechanoreceptors are a leading possibility. To address this, we assessed the relationship between two dilator muscle electromyograms (EMGs, i.e., genioglossus [GG - An inspiratory phasic muscle], tensor palatini [TP - A tonically active muscle]) and potential stimuli (i.e., epiglottic pressure [Pepi], airflow [V̇], and pharyngeal resistance [Rpha]). Fifteen normal subjects were studied, during wakefulness and stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The GGEMG and TPEMG were assessed during basal breathing and during inspiratory resistive loading (four loads, done in triplicate), while quantifying Pepi and choanal pressures (Pcho, Millar catheters) plus V̇. There was a strong correlation between Pepi and GGEMG during wakefulness in most subjects (9 of 15 had absolute R > 0.7 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.62, p <0.05). These correlations were less robust during NREM sleep (8 of 15 absolute R > 0.6 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.39, ns). The slope of the Pepi versus GGEMG relationship was greater during wakefulness than sleep (-0.67 versus -0.39% max/cm H2O, p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between TPEMG and any of the measured potential stimuli. We conclude that intrapharyngeal pressure may modulate genioglossus activity during wakefulness, with a fall in muscle responsiveness during sleep. The activity of the TP was not clearly influenced by any measured local stimulus either awake or asleep.

AB - The stimuli controlling pharyngeal dilator muscles are poorly defined. Local mechanoreceptors are a leading possibility. To address this, we assessed the relationship between two dilator muscle electromyograms (EMGs, i.e., genioglossus [GG - An inspiratory phasic muscle], tensor palatini [TP - A tonically active muscle]) and potential stimuli (i.e., epiglottic pressure [Pepi], airflow [V̇], and pharyngeal resistance [Rpha]). Fifteen normal subjects were studied, during wakefulness and stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The GGEMG and TPEMG were assessed during basal breathing and during inspiratory resistive loading (four loads, done in triplicate), while quantifying Pepi and choanal pressures (Pcho, Millar catheters) plus V̇. There was a strong correlation between Pepi and GGEMG during wakefulness in most subjects (9 of 15 had absolute R > 0.7 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.62, p <0.05). These correlations were less robust during NREM sleep (8 of 15 absolute R > 0.6 [p <0.05], group mean R = -0.39, ns). The slope of the Pepi versus GGEMG relationship was greater during wakefulness than sleep (-0.67 versus -0.39% max/cm H2O, p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between TPEMG and any of the measured potential stimuli. We conclude that intrapharyngeal pressure may modulate genioglossus activity during wakefulness, with a fall in muscle responsiveness during sleep. The activity of the TP was not clearly influenced by any measured local stimulus either awake or asleep.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033833805&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033833805&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10988130

AN - SCOPUS:0033833805

VL - 162

SP - 1058

EP - 1062

JO - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

JF - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1073-449X

IS - 3 I

ER -