Genetic test reporting enhances understanding of risk information and acceptance of prevention recommendations compared to family history-based counseling alone

Jennifer M. Taber, Lisa G. Aspinwall, Tammy K. Stump, Wendy Kohlmann, Marjan Champine, Sancy A. Leachman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is unknown whether or why genetic test reporting confers benefits in the understanding and management of cancer risk beyond what patients learn from counseling based on family history. A prospective nonexperimental control group study compared participants from melanoma-prone families who underwent CDKN2A/p16 (p16) genetic testing (27 carriers, 38 noncarriers) to participants from equivalently melanoma-prone families known not to carry a deleterious p16 mutation (31 no-test controls). All participants received equivalent counseling concerning elevated lifetime melanoma risk and corresponding recommendations for prevention and screening. Both immediately and 1 month after counseling, participants receiving a genetic test result reported greater understanding of their risk, decreased derogation of the risk information, and greater personal applicability of prevention recommendations than no-test controls. Decreased derogation of risk information after test reporting predicted further increases in understanding of melanoma risk and applicability of prevention recommendations 1 month later. Results suggest unique benefits of genetic test reporting in promoting understanding and acceptance of information about hereditary cancer risk and its management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)740-753
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2015

Keywords

  • CDKN2A/p16
  • Defensive processing
  • Genetic testing
  • Illness coherence
  • Melanoma
  • Understanding of risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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