Gender differences in T cell cytokine secretion and the adoptive transfer of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)

B. F. Bebo, J. C. Schuster, Arthur Vandenbark, Halina Offner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We used the adoptive transfer model of EAE to elucidate the role of gender on the induction and effector phases of disease. Proteolipid protein peptide 139-151 (PLP 139-151) sensitized spleen cells from female SJL mice were more effective at transferring disease than male cells. However there were no gender differences in the frequency of PLP 139-151 specific T cells. PLP 139-151 specific T cell lines induced more severe disease than male T cell lines. Disease severity was more strongly linked to the sex of the donor T cells, indicating that gender influences the immune response primarily during the induction phase. Female T cell lines secreted significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than male cells, suggesting that differences in the severity of clinical disease are related, at least in part, to differences in cytokine production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 20 1998

Fingerprint

T-cells
Autoimmune Experimental Encephalomyelitis
Adoptive Transfer
encephalitis
gender differences
Proteolipids
cytokines
T-lymphocytes
secretion
Cytokines
T-Lymphocytes
cell lines
peptides
Cell Line
Peptides
gender
Proteins
proteins
interleukin-10
splenocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Gender differences in T cell cytokine secretion and the adoptive transfer of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). / Bebo, B. F.; Schuster, J. C.; Vandenbark, Arthur; Offner, Halina.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 12, No. 5, 20.03.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c52c8df40b9447a4b46b70c4e4d2ee62,
title = "Gender differences in T cell cytokine secretion and the adoptive transfer of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)",
abstract = "We used the adoptive transfer model of EAE to elucidate the role of gender on the induction and effector phases of disease. Proteolipid protein peptide 139-151 (PLP 139-151) sensitized spleen cells from female SJL mice were more effective at transferring disease than male cells. However there were no gender differences in the frequency of PLP 139-151 specific T cells. PLP 139-151 specific T cell lines induced more severe disease than male T cell lines. Disease severity was more strongly linked to the sex of the donor T cells, indicating that gender influences the immune response primarily during the induction phase. Female T cell lines secreted significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than male cells, suggesting that differences in the severity of clinical disease are related, at least in part, to differences in cytokine production.",
author = "Bebo, {B. F.} and Schuster, {J. C.} and Arthur Vandenbark and Halina Offner",
year = "1998",
month = "3",
day = "20",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
journal = "FASEB Journal",
issn = "0892-6638",
publisher = "FASEB",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender differences in T cell cytokine secretion and the adoptive transfer of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)

AU - Bebo, B. F.

AU - Schuster, J. C.

AU - Vandenbark, Arthur

AU - Offner, Halina

PY - 1998/3/20

Y1 - 1998/3/20

N2 - We used the adoptive transfer model of EAE to elucidate the role of gender on the induction and effector phases of disease. Proteolipid protein peptide 139-151 (PLP 139-151) sensitized spleen cells from female SJL mice were more effective at transferring disease than male cells. However there were no gender differences in the frequency of PLP 139-151 specific T cells. PLP 139-151 specific T cell lines induced more severe disease than male T cell lines. Disease severity was more strongly linked to the sex of the donor T cells, indicating that gender influences the immune response primarily during the induction phase. Female T cell lines secreted significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than male cells, suggesting that differences in the severity of clinical disease are related, at least in part, to differences in cytokine production.

AB - We used the adoptive transfer model of EAE to elucidate the role of gender on the induction and effector phases of disease. Proteolipid protein peptide 139-151 (PLP 139-151) sensitized spleen cells from female SJL mice were more effective at transferring disease than male cells. However there were no gender differences in the frequency of PLP 139-151 specific T cells. PLP 139-151 specific T cell lines induced more severe disease than male T cell lines. Disease severity was more strongly linked to the sex of the donor T cells, indicating that gender influences the immune response primarily during the induction phase. Female T cell lines secreted significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than male cells, suggesting that differences in the severity of clinical disease are related, at least in part, to differences in cytokine production.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749355743&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33749355743&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - FASEB Journal

JF - FASEB Journal

SN - 0892-6638

IS - 5

ER -