Gender differences in publication productivity, academic rank, and career duration among U.S. academic gastroenterology faculty

Sarah Diamond, Charles Thomas, Sima Desai, Emma B. Holliday, Reshma Jagsi, Colleen Schmitt, Brintha Enestvedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Female representation in academic medicine is increasing without proportional increases in female representation at senior ranks. The purpose of this study is to describe the gender representation in academic gastroenterology (GI) and compare publication productivity, academic rank, and career duration between male and female gastroenterologists. Method In 2014, the authors collected data including number of publications, career duration, h-index, and m-index for faculty members at 114 U.S. academic GI programs. Results Of 2,440 academic faculty, 1,859 (76%) were men and 581 (24%) were women. Half (50%) of men held senior faculty position compared with 29% of women (P <.001). Compared with female faculty, male faculty had significantly (P <.001) longer careers (20 vs. 11 years), more publications (median 24 [0-949] vs. 9 [0-438]), and higher h-indices (8 vs. 4). Higher h-index correlated with higher academic rank (P <.001). The authors detected no difference in the h-index between men and women at the same rank for professor, associate professor, and instructor, nor any difference in the m-index between men and women (0.5 vs. 0.46, respectively, P =.214). Conclusions A gender gap exists in the number and proportion of women in academic GI; however, after correcting for career duration, productivity measures that consider quantity and impact are similar for male and female faculty. Women holding senior faculty positions are equally productive as their male counterparts. Early and continued career mentorship will likely lead to continued increases in the rise of women in academic rank.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1158-1163
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume91
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Gastroenterology
Publications
gender-specific factors
productivity
career
university teacher
proportion of women
Mentors
gender
instructor
Medicine
medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Gender differences in publication productivity, academic rank, and career duration among U.S. academic gastroenterology faculty. / Diamond, Sarah; Thomas, Charles; Desai, Sima; Holliday, Emma B.; Jagsi, Reshma; Schmitt, Colleen; Enestvedt, Brintha.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 91, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 1158-1163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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