Functional genomics in virology and antiviral drug discovery

Victor De Filippis, Camilo Raggo, Ashlee Moses, Klaus Frueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virology research and antiviral drug discovery are poised to benefit from the post-genomic revolution for three main reasons. First, viruses need the host to replicate and are therefore vulnerable to inhibition of cellular pathways. Knowledge of complete genomic sequences of both virus and host now permits the study of this interplay on a global scale. Combining transcriptomics and proteomics with large-scale gene knockdown experiments will enable the identification of novel antiviral targets. Second, massive parallel assay systems, such as DNA microarrays, which define the post-genomic era, will facilitate viral diagnostics. Third, the combination of genetics with genomics will enable the analysis of viral mutants and strains on an unprecedented scale. The dramatic effects of viral infection on host cell transcriptional patterns have been well-documented and will be briefly highlighted. In addition, we discuss recent trends that apply functional genomics methods to the discovery of new targets and therapies for viral disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-457
Number of pages6
JournalTrends in Biotechnology
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

Fingerprint

Virology
Virus Diseases
Drug Discovery
Genomics
Viruses
Antiviral Agents
Gene Knockdown Techniques
Microarrays
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Proteomics
Assays
DNA
Genes
Research
Experiments
Therapeutics
Genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Functional genomics in virology and antiviral drug discovery. / De Filippis, Victor; Raggo, Camilo; Moses, Ashlee; Frueh, Klaus.

In: Trends in Biotechnology, Vol. 21, No. 10, 10.2003, p. 452-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Filippis, Victor ; Raggo, Camilo ; Moses, Ashlee ; Frueh, Klaus. / Functional genomics in virology and antiviral drug discovery. In: Trends in Biotechnology. 2003 ; Vol. 21, No. 10. pp. 452-457.
@article{aeba849e934a407c827ad20ef9e2863a,
title = "Functional genomics in virology and antiviral drug discovery",
abstract = "Virology research and antiviral drug discovery are poised to benefit from the post-genomic revolution for three main reasons. First, viruses need the host to replicate and are therefore vulnerable to inhibition of cellular pathways. Knowledge of complete genomic sequences of both virus and host now permits the study of this interplay on a global scale. Combining transcriptomics and proteomics with large-scale gene knockdown experiments will enable the identification of novel antiviral targets. Second, massive parallel assay systems, such as DNA microarrays, which define the post-genomic era, will facilitate viral diagnostics. Third, the combination of genetics with genomics will enable the analysis of viral mutants and strains on an unprecedented scale. The dramatic effects of viral infection on host cell transcriptional patterns have been well-documented and will be briefly highlighted. In addition, we discuss recent trends that apply functional genomics methods to the discovery of new targets and therapies for viral disease.",
author = "{De Filippis}, Victor and Camilo Raggo and Ashlee Moses and Klaus Frueh",
year = "2003",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/S0167-7799(03)00207-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "452--457",
journal = "Trends in Biotechnology",
issn = "0167-7799",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional genomics in virology and antiviral drug discovery

AU - De Filippis, Victor

AU - Raggo, Camilo

AU - Moses, Ashlee

AU - Frueh, Klaus

PY - 2003/10

Y1 - 2003/10

N2 - Virology research and antiviral drug discovery are poised to benefit from the post-genomic revolution for three main reasons. First, viruses need the host to replicate and are therefore vulnerable to inhibition of cellular pathways. Knowledge of complete genomic sequences of both virus and host now permits the study of this interplay on a global scale. Combining transcriptomics and proteomics with large-scale gene knockdown experiments will enable the identification of novel antiviral targets. Second, massive parallel assay systems, such as DNA microarrays, which define the post-genomic era, will facilitate viral diagnostics. Third, the combination of genetics with genomics will enable the analysis of viral mutants and strains on an unprecedented scale. The dramatic effects of viral infection on host cell transcriptional patterns have been well-documented and will be briefly highlighted. In addition, we discuss recent trends that apply functional genomics methods to the discovery of new targets and therapies for viral disease.

AB - Virology research and antiviral drug discovery are poised to benefit from the post-genomic revolution for three main reasons. First, viruses need the host to replicate and are therefore vulnerable to inhibition of cellular pathways. Knowledge of complete genomic sequences of both virus and host now permits the study of this interplay on a global scale. Combining transcriptomics and proteomics with large-scale gene knockdown experiments will enable the identification of novel antiviral targets. Second, massive parallel assay systems, such as DNA microarrays, which define the post-genomic era, will facilitate viral diagnostics. Third, the combination of genetics with genomics will enable the analysis of viral mutants and strains on an unprecedented scale. The dramatic effects of viral infection on host cell transcriptional patterns have been well-documented and will be briefly highlighted. In addition, we discuss recent trends that apply functional genomics methods to the discovery of new targets and therapies for viral disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1042295488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1042295488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0167-7799(03)00207-5

DO - 10.1016/S0167-7799(03)00207-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 14512232

AN - SCOPUS:1042295488

VL - 21

SP - 452

EP - 457

JO - Trends in Biotechnology

JF - Trends in Biotechnology

SN - 0167-7799

IS - 10

ER -