Functional disability due to back pain. A population-based study indicating the importance of socioeconomic factors

Richard (Rick) Deyo, Y. J. Tsui-Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using national survey data, we examined correlates of disability due to low back pain in 1,516 persons who had back pain. Greater education level correlated significantly (P <0.001) with fewer disability days (i.e., days of activity limitation, absence from work, confinement to bed, or reduced housework), even after controlling for severity, sciatica, occupation, and age. Findings in men differed from those in women; education level was a strong correlate for men only. For work absenteeism, low income was a stronger correlate than education. These data support the importance of social factors in the prognosis of some musculoskeletal diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1253
Number of pages7
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume30
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Back Pain
Education
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Population
Sciatica
Housekeeping
Absenteeism
Low Back Pain
Occupations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Functional disability due to back pain. A population-based study indicating the importance of socioeconomic factors. / Deyo, Richard (Rick); Tsui-Wu, Y. J.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 30, No. 11, 1987, p. 1247-1253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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