Functional connectivity and cannabis use in high-risk adolescents

Jon M. Houck, Angela D. Bryan, Sarah Feldstein Ewing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Adolescence is a unique neurodevelopmental period when regions of the brain most able to assess risk and reward are still in development. Cannabis use during adolescence has been associated with persistent negative outcomes. Although measures of resting brain activity are useful in assessing functional connectivity, such measures have not been broadly applied in adolescent cannabis-users. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to analyze the associations between cannabis use and resting brain activity in a sample of high-risk adolescents. Methods: Eighty-two high-risk youth between 14-18 years old were recruited from a juvenile justice day program. Youth completed a brief neurocognitive battery including assessments of cannabis use and a 5-minute resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Intrinsic connectivity networks were extracted using the GIFT toolbox. Brain activity in a fronto-temporal network was compared in youth with high cannabis use vs. low cannabis use using an independent-samples t-test with alcohol use entered as a covariate. Results: Analysis revealed two elements within the fronto-temporal network related to cannabis use: one in middle frontal gyrus related to high cannabis use, and one in middle temporal gyrus related to low cannabis use. Only the frontal source survived application of a cluster size threshold and was significant at p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)414-423
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Brain
Social Justice
Temporal Lobe
Reward
Alcohols
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Cannabis
  • Functional connectivity
  • Functional mri
  • High-risk youth
  • Intrinsic connectivity networks
  • Resting state

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Functional connectivity and cannabis use in high-risk adolescents. / Houck, Jon M.; Bryan, Angela D.; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 39, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 414-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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