Food on film: Pilot test of an innovative method for recording food intake of adults with intellectual disabilities living in the community

Kathleen Humphries, Meg Ann Traci, Tom Seekins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities need dietary monitoring but are not likely to be able to provide accurate dietary intake data via traditional methods. Pilot study efforts to meet their support needs with a novel and practical approach to dietary intake data collection are described in this brief report. Materials and Method Still photography kits were used by nine adult volunteer participants with intellectual disabilities who lived in group homes or in semi-independent living arrangements to capture images of the food they consumed over 24 h. Results Use of photographs during dietary intake interviews improved the reliability of the participants' responses. Mean reliability ratings improved from 'Indiscernible/Poor' (mean range 1.0-1.7) to 'Good/Excellent' (mean range 3.6-5.0). Conclusions Our preliminary data imply that Food on Film is an effective and appropriate tool for use in community settings and warrants further testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-173
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Keywords

  • Developmental disabilities
  • Diet
  • Learning disorders
  • Mental retardation
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrition surveys

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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