Fluorescent microscope system to monitor real-time interactions between focused ultrasound, echogenic drug delivery vehicles, and live cell membranes

Stuart Ibsen, Michael Benchimol, Sadik Esener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid development in the field of ultrasound triggered drug delivery has made it essential to study the real-time interaction between the membranes of live cells and the membranes of echogenic delivery vehicles under exposure to focused ultrasound. The objective of this work was to design an analysis system that combined fluorescent imagining, high speed videography, and definable pulse sequences of focused ultrasound to allow for real time observations of both cell and vehicle membranes. Documenting the behavior of the membranes themselves has not previously been possible due to limitations with existing optical systems used to understand the basic physics of microbubble/ultrasound interaction and the basic interaction between microbubbles and cells. The performance of this new system to monitor membrane behavior was demonstrated by documenting the modes of vehicle fragmentation at different ultrasound intensity levels. At 1.5 MPa the membranes were shown to completely fragment while at intensities below 1 MPa the membranes pop open and slowly unfold. The interaction between these vehicles and cell membranes was also documented by the removal of fluorescent particles from the surfaces of live cells out to 20 μm from the microbubble location. The fluid flow created by microstreaming around ensonated microbubbles was documented at video recording speeds from 60 to 18,000 frames per second. This information about membrane behavior allows the chemical and physical properties of the drug delivery vehicle to be designed along with the ultrasound pulse sequence to cause the most efficient drug delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-184
Number of pages7
JournalUltrasonics
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

delivery
vehicles
drugs
microscopes
membranes
interactions
cells
design analysis
pulses
chemical properties
fluid flow
fragmentation
physical properties
recording
high speed
fragments
physics
causes

Keywords

  • Fluorescence imaging
  • High speed videography
  • Live cell membrane
  • Microbubble cavitation
  • Microstreaming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

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