Flow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primatesflow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primates

Christine Meyer, Kristen Haberthur, Mark Asquith, Ilhem Messaoudi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Flow cytometry is an invaluable technique that can be used to phenotypically and functionally characterize immune cell populations ex vivo. This technology has greatly advanced our ability to gain critical insight into age-related changes in immune function, commonly known as immune senescence. Rodents have been traditionally used to investigate the molecular mechanisms of immune senescence because they offer the distinct advantages of an extensive set of reagents, the presence of genetically modified strains, and a short lifespan that allows for longevity studies of short duration. More recently, nonhuman primates (NHPs), and specifically rhesus macaques, have emerged as a leading translational model to study various aspects of human aging. In contrast to rodents, they share significant genetic homology as well as physiological and behavioral characteristics with humans. Furthermore, rhesus macaques are a long-lived out bred species, which makes them an ideal translational model. Therefore, NHPs offer a unique opportunity to carry out mechanistic studies under controlled laboratory conditions (e.g., photoperiod, temperature, diet, and medications) in a species that closely mimics human biology. Moreover similar techniques (e.g., activity recording and MRI) can be used to measure physiological parameters in NHPs, making direct comparisons between NHP and human data sets possible. In addition, the out bred genetics of NHPs enables rigorous validation of research findings that goes beyond proof of principle. Finally, self-selection bias that is often unavoidable in human clinical trials can be completely eliminated with NHP studies. Here we describe flow cytometry-based methods to phenotypically and functionally characterize innate immune cells as well as T and B lymphocyte subsets from isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in rhesus macaques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages65-80
Number of pages16
Volume1343
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1343
ISSN (Print)10643745

Fingerprint

Primates
Flow Cytometry
Macaca mulatta
Rodentia
B-Lymphocyte Subsets
Selection Bias
Photoperiod
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Blood Cells
Clinical Trials
Diet
Technology
Temperature
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Age
  • B cell
  • Cytokine
  • Dendritic cell
  • Flow cytometry
  • Lymphocyte
  • Monocyte
  • Natural killer cell
  • Pattern recognition receptor
  • Proliferation
  • Regulatory T cell
  • Rhesus macaque
  • T cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Meyer, C., Haberthur, K., Asquith, M., & Messaoudi, I. (2015). Flow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primatesflow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primates. In Methods in Molecular Biology (Vol. 1343, pp. 65-80). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1343). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2963-4_6

Flow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primatesflow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primates. / Meyer, Christine; Haberthur, Kristen; Asquith, Mark; Messaoudi, Ilhem.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1343 Humana Press Inc., 2015. p. 65-80 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1343).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Meyer, C, Haberthur, K, Asquith, M & Messaoudi, I 2015, Flow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primatesflow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primates. in Methods in Molecular Biology. vol. 1343, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1343, Humana Press Inc., pp. 65-80. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2963-4_6
Meyer C, Haberthur K, Asquith M, Messaoudi I. Flow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primatesflow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primates. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1343. Humana Press Inc. 2015. p. 65-80. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2963-4_6
Meyer, Christine ; Haberthur, Kristen ; Asquith, Mark ; Messaoudi, Ilhem. / Flow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primatesflow cytometry-based methods to characterize immune senescence in nonhuman primates. Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1343 Humana Press Inc., 2015. pp. 65-80 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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