Flow cytometric chemosensitivity assay as a predictive tool of early clinical response in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Faith Galderisi, Linda Stork, Ju Li, Motomi (Tomi) Mori, Solange Mongoue-Tchokote, James Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Residual disease or rapidity of response to induction therapy is among the most powerful predictors of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Method. Utilizing a multiparameter flow cytometric chemosensitivity assay (FCCA), we studied the relationship between in vitro drug sensitivity of diagnostic leukemic blasts from 30 children with ALL and rapidity of response to induction therapy. We also analyzed the in vitro drug sensitivity of de novo leukemic blasts among various clinical subsets. Results. Compared to rapid early responders (RERs), slow early responders (SERs) had a significantly greater in vitro drug resistance to dexamethasone (DEX; P=0.04) and prednisone (P=0.05). The studies with all other drugs showed a non-significant trend with the SER having a higher in vitro drug resistance compared to the RER. Risk group stratified analyses indicated that in vitro resistance to asparaginase (ASP), DEX, and vincristine (VCR) were each significantly related to having very high risk ALL. Additionally, a significantly higher in vitro drug resistance to ASP and VCR was associated with unfavorable lymphoblast genetics and ultimate relapse. Conclusion. Our data indicate that this FCCA is a potentially simple and rapid method to detect inherent resistance to initial ALL therapy very early in induction, thus allowing for treatment modification shortly thereafter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-550
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

Fingerprint

Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Drug Resistance
Asparaginase
Vincristine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics
Prednisone
Dexamethasone
In Vitro Techniques
Pediatrics
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia
  • Chemosensitivity assay
  • Childhood
  • Flow cytometry
  • In vitro drug resistance
  • Response to induction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Flow cytometric chemosensitivity assay as a predictive tool of early clinical response in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. / Galderisi, Faith; Stork, Linda; Li, Ju; Mori, Motomi (Tomi); Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Huang, James.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 53, No. 4, 10.2009, p. 543-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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