Flow Cytofluorometric Detection of Tumor-specific Rosette-forming Cells in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck1

Alex W. Tong, William Kraybill, R. Mark Vetto, Denis R. Burger, Arthur A. Vandenbark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tumor-specific rosette-forming cells reactive to solubilized tumor antigens conjugated to autologous erythrocytes were quantitated by flow cytofluorometry. Leukocytes from a high frequency of the patients (>70%) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SQCC) formed rosettes to the conjugated SQCC tumor antigens but not to other histologically distinct tumor antigens (melanoma and colon carcinoma). Healthy control subjects or tumor patients with other cancers were mostly unreactive to the SQCC tumor extract [1 of 21 (5%) and 1 of 14 (7%) for controls and tumor patients, respectively]. Rosette-forming activity was observed in SQCC patients with primary cancers [22 of 30 (73%)] or in remission [5 of 6 (83%)], whereas patients with tumor recurrence were uniformly unresponsive [0 of 9 (0%)]. Tumor-specific rosette formation was mediated predominantly by monocytes, as identified by histochemical techniques and physiological properties. Rosette formation in reactive patients was abrogated by short-term culture, but the abated response could be restored by incubation with autologous serum or sera from other rosette-forming cell-positive patients. However, responsiveness of nonreactive patients with SQCC recurrence could not be constituted by rosette-forming cell-positive sera. These observations suggested the presence of tumor-reactive monocytes in a high frequency of patients with primary cancer or in remission but not in patients with recurrent disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2949-2955
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Research
Volume42
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Flow Cytofluorometric Detection of Tumor-specific Rosette-forming Cells in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck1'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this