Fixed-wing medical transport crashes

Characteristics associated with fatal outcomes

Daniel A. Handel, Thomas Yackel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Previous studies within the aeromedical literature have looked at factors associated with fatal outcomes in helicopter medical transport, but no analysis has been conducted on fixed-wing aeromedical flights. The purpose of this study was to look at fatality rates in fixed-wing aeromedical transport and compare them with general aviation and helicopter aeromedical flights. Methods: This study looked at factors associated with fatal outcomes in fixed-wing aeromedical flights, using the National Transportation Safety Board Aviation Accident Incident Database from 1984 to 2009. Results: Fatal outcomes were significantly higher in medical flights (35.6 vs. 19.7%), with more aircraft fires (20.3 vs. 10.5%) and on-ground collisions (5.1 vs. 2.0%) compared with commercial flights. Aircraft fires occurred in 12 of the 21 fatal crashes (57.1%), compared with only 2 of the 38 nonfatal crashes (5.3%) (P <.001). In the multiple logistic regression model, the only factor with increased odds of a fatal outcome was the presence of a fire (56.89; 95% CI, 4.28-808.23). Conclusions: Similar to published studies in helicopter medical transport, postcrash fires are the primary factor associated with fatal outcomes in fixed-wing aeromedical flights.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-152
Number of pages4
JournalAir Medical Journal
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Fatal Outcome
Aircraft
Aviation Accidents
Logistic Models
Aviation
Databases
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Fixed-wing medical transport crashes : Characteristics associated with fatal outcomes. / Handel, Daniel A.; Yackel, Thomas.

In: Air Medical Journal, Vol. 30, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 149-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Handel, Daniel A. ; Yackel, Thomas. / Fixed-wing medical transport crashes : Characteristics associated with fatal outcomes. In: Air Medical Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 149-152.
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