Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction

Monika K. Duda, Karen M. O'Shea, Anselm Tintinu, Wenhong Xu, Ramzi J. Khairallah, Brian R. Barrows, David J. Chess, Agnes M. Azimzadeh, William Harris, Victor G. Sharov, Hani N. Sabbah, William C. Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Clinical studies suggest that intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) may lower the incidence of heart failure. Dietary supplementation with ω-3 PUFA exerts metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects that could prevent left ventricle (LV) pathology; however, it is unclear whether these effects occur at clinically relevant doses and whether there are differences between ω-3 PUFA from fish [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] and vegetable sources [α-linolenic acid (ALA)]. Methods and results: We assessed the development of LV remodelling and pathology in rats subjected to aortic banding treated with ω-3 PUFA over a dose range that spanned the intake of humans taking ω-3 PUFA supplements. Rats were fed a standard food or diets supplemented with EPA+DHA or ALA at 0.7, 2.3, or 7% of energy intake. Without supplementation, aortic banding increased LV mass and end-systolic and -diastolic volumes. ALA supplementation had little effect on LV remodelling and dysfunction. In contrast, EPA+DHA dose-dependently increased EPA and DHA, decreased arachidonic acid in cardiac membrane phospholipids, and prevented the increase in LV end-diastolic and -systolic volumes. EPA+DHA resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the anti-inflammatory adipokine adiponectin, and there was a strong correlation between the prevention of LV chamber enlargement and plasma levels of adiponectin (r = -0.78). Supplementation with EPA+DHA had anti-aggregatory and anti-inflammatory effects as evidenced by decreases in urinary thromboxane B2 and serum tumour necrosis factor-α. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation with ω-3 PUFA derived from fish, but not from vegetable sources, increased plasma adiponectin, suppressed inflammation, and prevented cardiac remodelling and dysfunction under pressure overload conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-327
Number of pages9
JournalCardiovascular Research
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Linseed Oil
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Fish Oils
Inflammation
Pressure
Heart Ventricles
Adiponectin
Ventricular Remodeling
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Dietary Supplements
Vegetables
Fishes
Pathology
Thromboxane B2
Adipokines
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Energy Intake
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Arachidonic Acid

Keywords

  • α-linolenic acid
  • Diet
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Heart failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Duda, M. K., O'Shea, K. M., Tintinu, A., Xu, W., Khairallah, R. J., Barrows, B. R., ... Stanley, W. C. (2009). Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction. Cardiovascular Research, 81(2), 319-327. https://doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvn310

Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction. / Duda, Monika K.; O'Shea, Karen M.; Tintinu, Anselm; Xu, Wenhong; Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Barrows, Brian R.; Chess, David J.; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Harris, William; Sharov, Victor G.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Stanley, William C.

In: Cardiovascular Research, Vol. 81, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 319-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duda, MK, O'Shea, KM, Tintinu, A, Xu, W, Khairallah, RJ, Barrows, BR, Chess, DJ, Azimzadeh, AM, Harris, W, Sharov, VG, Sabbah, HN & Stanley, WC 2009, 'Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction', Cardiovascular Research, vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 319-327. https://doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvn310
Duda, Monika K. ; O'Shea, Karen M. ; Tintinu, Anselm ; Xu, Wenhong ; Khairallah, Ramzi J. ; Barrows, Brian R. ; Chess, David J. ; Azimzadeh, Agnes M. ; Harris, William ; Sharov, Victor G. ; Sabbah, Hani N. ; Stanley, William C. / Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction. In: Cardiovascular Research. 2009 ; Vol. 81, No. 2. pp. 319-327.
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AU - Xu, Wenhong

AU - Khairallah, Ramzi J.

AU - Barrows, Brian R.

AU - Chess, David J.

AU - Azimzadeh, Agnes M.

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