Financial and Health Barriers and Caregiving-Related Difficulties Among Rural and Urban Caregivers

Erin D. Bouldin, Lynn Shaull, Elena Andresen, Valerie J. Edwards, Lisa C. Mcguire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess whether financial or health-related barriers were more common among rural caregivers and whether rural caregivers experienced more caregiving-related difficulties than their urban peers. Methods: We used data from 7,436 respondents to the Caregiver Module in 10 states from the 2011-2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Respondents were classified as caregivers if they reported providing care to a family member or friend because of a long-term illness or disability. We classified respondents as living in a rural area if they lived outside of a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We defined a financial barrier as having an annual household income <$25,000 or not being able see a doctor when needed in the past year because of cost. We defined a health barrier as having multiple chronic health conditions, a disability, or fair or poor self-rated health. Findings: Rural caregivers more frequently had financial barriers than urban caregivers (38.1% vs 31.0%, P = .0001), but the prevalence of health barriers was similar (43.3% vs 40.6%, P = .18). After adjusting for demographic differences, financial barriers remained more common among rural caregivers. Rural caregivers were less likely than their urban peers to report that caregiving created any difficulty in both unadjusted and adjusted models (adjusted prevalence ratio = 0.90; P < .001). Conclusions: Informal caregivers, particularly in rural areas, face financial barriers. Rural caregivers were less likely than urban caregivers to report caregiving-related difficulties. Rural caregivers' coping strategies or skills in identifying informal supports may explain this difference, but additional research is needed to explore this hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Rural Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Health
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Demography
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Geography
  • Geriatrics
  • Long-term care
  • Observational data

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Financial and Health Barriers and Caregiving-Related Difficulties Among Rural and Urban Caregivers. / Bouldin, Erin D.; Shaull, Lynn; Andresen, Elena; Edwards, Valerie J.; Mcguire, Lisa C.

In: Journal of Rural Health, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{215bdc9beb8a4744b3b3d3f616a6d260,
title = "Financial and Health Barriers and Caregiving-Related Difficulties Among Rural and Urban Caregivers",
abstract = "Purpose: To assess whether financial or health-related barriers were more common among rural caregivers and whether rural caregivers experienced more caregiving-related difficulties than their urban peers. Methods: We used data from 7,436 respondents to the Caregiver Module in 10 states from the 2011-2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Respondents were classified as caregivers if they reported providing care to a family member or friend because of a long-term illness or disability. We classified respondents as living in a rural area if they lived outside of a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We defined a financial barrier as having an annual household income <$25,000 or not being able see a doctor when needed in the past year because of cost. We defined a health barrier as having multiple chronic health conditions, a disability, or fair or poor self-rated health. Findings: Rural caregivers more frequently had financial barriers than urban caregivers (38.1{\%} vs 31.0{\%}, P = .0001), but the prevalence of health barriers was similar (43.3{\%} vs 40.6{\%}, P = .18). After adjusting for demographic differences, financial barriers remained more common among rural caregivers. Rural caregivers were less likely than their urban peers to report that caregiving created any difficulty in both unadjusted and adjusted models (adjusted prevalence ratio = 0.90; P < .001). Conclusions: Informal caregivers, particularly in rural areas, face financial barriers. Rural caregivers were less likely than urban caregivers to report caregiving-related difficulties. Rural caregivers' coping strategies or skills in identifying informal supports may explain this difference, but additional research is needed to explore this hypothesis.",
keywords = "Epidemiology, Geography, Geriatrics, Long-term care, Observational data",
author = "Bouldin, {Erin D.} and Lynn Shaull and Elena Andresen and Edwards, {Valerie J.} and Mcguire, {Lisa C.}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1111/jrh.12273",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Rural Health",
issn = "0890-765X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Financial and Health Barriers and Caregiving-Related Difficulties Among Rural and Urban Caregivers

AU - Bouldin, Erin D.

AU - Shaull, Lynn

AU - Andresen, Elena

AU - Edwards, Valerie J.

AU - Mcguire, Lisa C.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Purpose: To assess whether financial or health-related barriers were more common among rural caregivers and whether rural caregivers experienced more caregiving-related difficulties than their urban peers. Methods: We used data from 7,436 respondents to the Caregiver Module in 10 states from the 2011-2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Respondents were classified as caregivers if they reported providing care to a family member or friend because of a long-term illness or disability. We classified respondents as living in a rural area if they lived outside of a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We defined a financial barrier as having an annual household income <$25,000 or not being able see a doctor when needed in the past year because of cost. We defined a health barrier as having multiple chronic health conditions, a disability, or fair or poor self-rated health. Findings: Rural caregivers more frequently had financial barriers than urban caregivers (38.1% vs 31.0%, P = .0001), but the prevalence of health barriers was similar (43.3% vs 40.6%, P = .18). After adjusting for demographic differences, financial barriers remained more common among rural caregivers. Rural caregivers were less likely than their urban peers to report that caregiving created any difficulty in both unadjusted and adjusted models (adjusted prevalence ratio = 0.90; P < .001). Conclusions: Informal caregivers, particularly in rural areas, face financial barriers. Rural caregivers were less likely than urban caregivers to report caregiving-related difficulties. Rural caregivers' coping strategies or skills in identifying informal supports may explain this difference, but additional research is needed to explore this hypothesis.

AB - Purpose: To assess whether financial or health-related barriers were more common among rural caregivers and whether rural caregivers experienced more caregiving-related difficulties than their urban peers. Methods: We used data from 7,436 respondents to the Caregiver Module in 10 states from the 2011-2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Respondents were classified as caregivers if they reported providing care to a family member or friend because of a long-term illness or disability. We classified respondents as living in a rural area if they lived outside of a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We defined a financial barrier as having an annual household income <$25,000 or not being able see a doctor when needed in the past year because of cost. We defined a health barrier as having multiple chronic health conditions, a disability, or fair or poor self-rated health. Findings: Rural caregivers more frequently had financial barriers than urban caregivers (38.1% vs 31.0%, P = .0001), but the prevalence of health barriers was similar (43.3% vs 40.6%, P = .18). After adjusting for demographic differences, financial barriers remained more common among rural caregivers. Rural caregivers were less likely than their urban peers to report that caregiving created any difficulty in both unadjusted and adjusted models (adjusted prevalence ratio = 0.90; P < .001). Conclusions: Informal caregivers, particularly in rural areas, face financial barriers. Rural caregivers were less likely than urban caregivers to report caregiving-related difficulties. Rural caregivers' coping strategies or skills in identifying informal supports may explain this difference, but additional research is needed to explore this hypothesis.

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Geography

KW - Geriatrics

KW - Long-term care

KW - Observational data

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030327819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030327819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jrh.12273

DO - 10.1111/jrh.12273

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Rural Health

JF - Journal of Rural Health

SN - 0890-765X

ER -