Field Trial for Autistic Disorder in DSM-FV

Fred R. Volkmar, Ami Klin, Bryna Siegel, Peter Szatmari, Catherine Lord, Magda Campbell, B. J. Freeman, Domenic V. Cicchetti, Michael Rutter, William Kline, Jan Buitelaar, Yossie Hattab, Eric Fombonne, Joaquin Fuentes, John Werry, Wendy Stone, J. Kerbeshian, Yoshihiko Hoshino, Joel Bregman, Kathenne LovelandLudwig Szymanski, Kenneth Towbin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

265 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This project focused on the development of the definition of autism for DSM-IV. Method: Multiple sites were involved in obtaining information regarding 977 patients with the following clinician-assigned diagnoses: autism (N=454), other pervasive developmental disorders (N=240), and other disorders (N=283). A standard coding system was used, and the raters (N=IlS) had a range of experience in the diagnosis of autism. Patterns of agreement among existing diagnostic systems were examined, as was the rationale for inclusion of other disorders within the class of pervasive developmental disorders. Results: The DSM-III-R definition of autism was found to be overly broad. The proposed ICD-10 definition most closely approximated the clinicians' diagnoses. Inclusion of other disorders within pervasive developmental disorders appeared justified. Partly on the basis of these data, modifications m the ICD-IO definition were made; this and the DSM-IV definition are conceptually identical. Conclusions: The resulting convergence of the DSM-IV and ICD-IO systems should facilitate both research and clinical service.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1361-1367
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume151
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Autistic Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
International Classification of Diseases
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Volkmar, F. R., Klin, A., Siegel, B., Szatmari, P., Lord, C., Campbell, M., ... Towbin, K. (1994). Field Trial for Autistic Disorder in DSM-FV. American Journal of Psychiatry, 151(9), 1361-1367.

Field Trial for Autistic Disorder in DSM-FV. / Volkmar, Fred R.; Klin, Ami; Siegel, Bryna; Szatmari, Peter; Lord, Catherine; Campbell, Magda; Freeman, B. J.; Cicchetti, Domenic V.; Rutter, Michael; Kline, William; Buitelaar, Jan; Hattab, Yossie; Fombonne, Eric; Fuentes, Joaquin; Werry, John; Stone, Wendy; Kerbeshian, J.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Bregman, Joel; Loveland, Kathenne; Szymanski, Ludwig; Towbin, Kenneth.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 151, No. 9, 09.1994, p. 1361-1367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Volkmar, FR, Klin, A, Siegel, B, Szatmari, P, Lord, C, Campbell, M, Freeman, BJ, Cicchetti, DV, Rutter, M, Kline, W, Buitelaar, J, Hattab, Y, Fombonne, E, Fuentes, J, Werry, J, Stone, W, Kerbeshian, J, Hoshino, Y, Bregman, J, Loveland, K, Szymanski, L & Towbin, K 1994, 'Field Trial for Autistic Disorder in DSM-FV', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 151, no. 9, pp. 1361-1367.
Volkmar FR, Klin A, Siegel B, Szatmari P, Lord C, Campbell M et al. Field Trial for Autistic Disorder in DSM-FV. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1994 Sep;151(9):1361-1367.
Volkmar, Fred R. ; Klin, Ami ; Siegel, Bryna ; Szatmari, Peter ; Lord, Catherine ; Campbell, Magda ; Freeman, B. J. ; Cicchetti, Domenic V. ; Rutter, Michael ; Kline, William ; Buitelaar, Jan ; Hattab, Yossie ; Fombonne, Eric ; Fuentes, Joaquin ; Werry, John ; Stone, Wendy ; Kerbeshian, J. ; Hoshino, Yoshihiko ; Bregman, Joel ; Loveland, Kathenne ; Szymanski, Ludwig ; Towbin, Kenneth. / Field Trial for Autistic Disorder in DSM-FV. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1994 ; Vol. 151, No. 9. pp. 1361-1367.
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