Fibromyalgia: The commonest cause of widespread pain

Robert (Rob) Bennett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    FM affects approximately six million Americans, four million are women. It is a chronic muscle pain syndrome with poorly understood associations with many other conditions. Although there is no distinctive pathophysiological basis for the syndrome, these patients are readily recognized by their history of widespread body pain and multiple tender-point areas. Failure to recognize these patients results in much frustration, both in the physician and in the patient, and often results in unnecessary investigations. Treatment of FM patients has to be individualistic and demands a holistic approach; this requires time, empathy, and interaction with other specialists. Providing effective treatment to these patients is a true test of a physician's skill.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)269-275
    Number of pages7
    JournalComprehensive Therapy
    Volume21
    Issue number6
    StatePublished - 1995

    Fingerprint

    Fibromyalgia
    Pain
    Physicians
    Frustration
    Myalgia
    Chronic Pain
    Therapeutics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Fibromyalgia : The commonest cause of widespread pain. / Bennett, Robert (Rob).

    In: Comprehensive Therapy, Vol. 21, No. 6, 1995, p. 269-275.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bennett, RR 1995, 'Fibromyalgia: The commonest cause of widespread pain', Comprehensive Therapy, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 269-275.
    Bennett, Robert (Rob). / Fibromyalgia : The commonest cause of widespread pain. In: Comprehensive Therapy. 1995 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 269-275.
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