Fetal growth and subsequent mental health problems in children aged 4 to 13 years

Stephen R. Zubrick, Jennifer J. Kurinczuk, Brett M C McDermott, Robert (Bob) McKelvey, Sven R. Silburn, Lisa C. Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that children with suboptimal fetal growth have significantly poorer mental health outcomes than those with optimal growth, a population random sample survey of children aged 4 to 16 years in Western Australia in 1993 was conducted. The Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach 1991a) and the Teacher Report Form (Achenbach 1991b) were used to define mental health morbidity. Survey data for 1775 children aged 4 to 13 years were available for linkage with original birth information. The percentage of expected birthweight (PEBW) was used as the measure of fetal growth. Children below the 2nd centile of PEBW who had achieved only 57% to 72% of their expected birthweight gives their gestation at delivery were at significant risk of a mental health morbidity (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.18, 7.12). In addition, they were more likely to be rated as academically impaired (OR 6.0, 95% CI 2.25, 16.06) and to have poor general health (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.69, 15.52).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Fetal Development
Mental Health
Morbidity
Western Australia
Population Growth
Child Behavior
Checklist
Parturition
Pregnancy
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Zubrick, S. R., Kurinczuk, J. J., McDermott, B. M. C., McKelvey, R. B., Silburn, S. R., & Davies, L. C. (2000). Fetal growth and subsequent mental health problems in children aged 4 to 13 years. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 42(1), 14-20. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0012162200000049

Fetal growth and subsequent mental health problems in children aged 4 to 13 years. / Zubrick, Stephen R.; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; McDermott, Brett M C; McKelvey, Robert (Bob); Silburn, Sven R.; Davies, Lisa C.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2000, p. 14-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zubrick, SR, Kurinczuk, JJ, McDermott, BMC, McKelvey, RB, Silburn, SR & Davies, LC 2000, 'Fetal growth and subsequent mental health problems in children aged 4 to 13 years', Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 14-20. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0012162200000049
Zubrick, Stephen R. ; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J. ; McDermott, Brett M C ; McKelvey, Robert (Bob) ; Silburn, Sven R. ; Davies, Lisa C. / Fetal growth and subsequent mental health problems in children aged 4 to 13 years. In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. 2000 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 14-20.
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