Fatal poisoning among American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in New Mexico, 1958 to 1982.

L. M. Olson, W. G. Troutman, C. L. Wiggins, Thomas Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood fatalities from unintentional poisoning are a substantial health problem in New Mexico, which ranks second in the nation in injury-related mortality rates. To determine the extent of poison-related mortality in children in this state, and to examine time trends and differences in mortality rates in New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children aged 0 to 14 years, we analyzed vital records collected from 1958 to 1982. New Mexican children experienced higher mortality rates than US white children of similar age--approximately eight times higher for children under 5 years old. Of the three ethnic groups, American Indian children had the highest mortality rates from unintentional poisoning during the 25-year period. Children less than 5 years old were at the highest risk for poison-related fatalities among all three ethnic groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-262
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity & disease
Volume1
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Hispanic Americans
Poisoning
Mortality
Poisons
Ethnic Groups
Child Mortality
Health
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Fatal poisoning among American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in New Mexico, 1958 to 1982. / Olson, L. M.; Troutman, W. G.; Wiggins, C. L.; Becker, Thomas.

In: Ethnicity & disease, Vol. 1, No. 3, 06.1991, p. 257-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b32ae736ae0548a3b2b6fda81043a3d7,
title = "Fatal poisoning among American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in New Mexico, 1958 to 1982.",
abstract = "Childhood fatalities from unintentional poisoning are a substantial health problem in New Mexico, which ranks second in the nation in injury-related mortality rates. To determine the extent of poison-related mortality in children in this state, and to examine time trends and differences in mortality rates in New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children aged 0 to 14 years, we analyzed vital records collected from 1958 to 1982. New Mexican children experienced higher mortality rates than US white children of similar age--approximately eight times higher for children under 5 years old. Of the three ethnic groups, American Indian children had the highest mortality rates from unintentional poisoning during the 25-year period. Children less than 5 years old were at the highest risk for poison-related fatalities among all three ethnic groups.",
author = "Olson, {L. M.} and Troutman, {W. G.} and Wiggins, {C. L.} and Thomas Becker",
year = "1991",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "257--262",
journal = "Ethnicity and Disease",
issn = "1049-510X",
publisher = "ISHIB",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fatal poisoning among American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in New Mexico, 1958 to 1982.

AU - Olson, L. M.

AU - Troutman, W. G.

AU - Wiggins, C. L.

AU - Becker, Thomas

PY - 1991/6

Y1 - 1991/6

N2 - Childhood fatalities from unintentional poisoning are a substantial health problem in New Mexico, which ranks second in the nation in injury-related mortality rates. To determine the extent of poison-related mortality in children in this state, and to examine time trends and differences in mortality rates in New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children aged 0 to 14 years, we analyzed vital records collected from 1958 to 1982. New Mexican children experienced higher mortality rates than US white children of similar age--approximately eight times higher for children under 5 years old. Of the three ethnic groups, American Indian children had the highest mortality rates from unintentional poisoning during the 25-year period. Children less than 5 years old were at the highest risk for poison-related fatalities among all three ethnic groups.

AB - Childhood fatalities from unintentional poisoning are a substantial health problem in New Mexico, which ranks second in the nation in injury-related mortality rates. To determine the extent of poison-related mortality in children in this state, and to examine time trends and differences in mortality rates in New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children aged 0 to 14 years, we analyzed vital records collected from 1958 to 1982. New Mexican children experienced higher mortality rates than US white children of similar age--approximately eight times higher for children under 5 years old. Of the three ethnic groups, American Indian children had the highest mortality rates from unintentional poisoning during the 25-year period. Children less than 5 years old were at the highest risk for poison-related fatalities among all three ethnic groups.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026174427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026174427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 257

EP - 262

JO - Ethnicity and Disease

JF - Ethnicity and Disease

SN - 1049-510X

IS - 3

ER -