Family privacy as protection: A qualitative pilot study of mental illness in Arab-American muslim women

Dena Hassouneh, Anahid Kulwicki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Arab-American Muslim women are a group whose cultural beliefs about mental illness are poorly understood. Moreover, the availability of literature specific to this population is limited. To begin to address the paucity of information available we conducted a qualitative pilot study. The overall aim was to preliminarily explore contexts and meanings about mental illness in Arab-American Muslim women. Interviews with eight women were completed. Data analysis occurred concurrently with data collection using an iterative process. The central theme identified in the narratives was family privacy as protection. The study's primary conclusion is that an in-depth understanding of the meaning of family in Arab-American Muslim women's lives is critical to our ability to effectively address their mental health needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResearch in the Social Scientific Study of Religion
EditorsRalph L. Piedmont, Andrew Village
PublisherEntomological Society of Canada
Pages195-215
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9789004175624
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameResearch in the Social Scientific Study of Religion
Volume20
ISSN (Print)1046-8064

Keywords

  • Arab
  • Culture
  • Mental health
  • Muslim
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Religious studies
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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