Falls and Frailty in Prostate Cancer Survivors: Current, Past, and Never Users of Androgen Deprivation Therapy

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To compare the prevalence of and association between falls and frailty of prostate cancer survivors (PCSs) who were current, past or never users of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Mail and electronic survey. Participants: PCSs (N = 280; mean age 72 ± 8). Measurements: Cancer history, falls, and frailty status (robust, prefrail, frail) using traditionally defined and obese phenotypes. Results: Current (37%) or past (34%) ADT users were more than twice as likely to have fallen in the previous year as never users (15%) (P = .002). ADT users had twice as many recurrent falls (P < .001) and more fall-related injuries than unexposed men (P = .01). Current (43%) or past (40%) ADT users were more likely to be classified as prefrail or frail than never users (15%) (P < .001), and the prevalence of combined obese frailty + prefrailty was even greater in current (59%) or past (62%) ADT users than never users (25%) (P < .001). Traditional and obese frailty significantly increased the likelihood of reporting falls in the previous year (odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.18-3.94 and OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.62-5.58, respectively) and was also associated with greater risk of recurrent falls (OR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.48-6.5 and OR = 3.99, 95% CI = 1.79-8.89, respectively). Conclusions: Current and past exposure to ADT is linked to higher risk of falls and frailty than no treatment. PCSs should be appropriately counseled on fall prevention strategies, and approaches to reduce frailty should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Androgens
Survivors
Prostatic Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Therapeutics
Phenotype
Wounds and Injuries
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Androgens
  • Falls
  • Frailty
  • Prostate cancer
  • Survivorship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{a5bb97a3b8f344b2b1a78c8f06c7502f,
title = "Falls and Frailty in Prostate Cancer Survivors: Current, Past, and Never Users of Androgen Deprivation Therapy",
abstract = "Objectives: To compare the prevalence of and association between falls and frailty of prostate cancer survivors (PCSs) who were current, past or never users of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Mail and electronic survey. Participants: PCSs (N = 280; mean age 72 ± 8). Measurements: Cancer history, falls, and frailty status (robust, prefrail, frail) using traditionally defined and obese phenotypes. Results: Current (37{\%}) or past (34{\%}) ADT users were more than twice as likely to have fallen in the previous year as never users (15{\%}) (P = .002). ADT users had twice as many recurrent falls (P < .001) and more fall-related injuries than unexposed men (P = .01). Current (43{\%}) or past (40{\%}) ADT users were more likely to be classified as prefrail or frail than never users (15{\%}) (P < .001), and the prevalence of combined obese frailty + prefrailty was even greater in current (59{\%}) or past (62{\%}) ADT users than never users (25{\%}) (P < .001). Traditional and obese frailty significantly increased the likelihood of reporting falls in the previous year (odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, 95{\%} CI = 1.18-3.94 and OR = 2.97, 95{\%} CI = 1.62-5.58, respectively) and was also associated with greater risk of recurrent falls (OR = 3.10, 95{\%} CI = 1.48-6.5 and OR = 3.99, 95{\%} CI = 1.79-8.89, respectively). Conclusions: Current and past exposure to ADT is linked to higher risk of falls and frailty than no treatment. PCSs should be appropriately counseled on fall prevention strategies, and approaches to reduce frailty should be considered.",
keywords = "Androgens, Falls, Frailty, Prostate cancer, Survivorship",
author = "Kerri Winters-Stone and Esther Moe and Julie Graff and Nathan Dieckmann and Sydnee Stoyles and Carolyn Borsch and Joshi Alumkal and Christopher Amling and Beer, {Tomasz (Tom)}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1111/jgs.14795",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Falls and Frailty in Prostate Cancer Survivors

T2 - Current, Past, and Never Users of Androgen Deprivation Therapy

AU - Winters-Stone, Kerri

AU - Moe, Esther

AU - Graff, Julie

AU - Dieckmann, Nathan

AU - Stoyles, Sydnee

AU - Borsch, Carolyn

AU - Alumkal, Joshi

AU - Amling, Christopher

AU - Beer, Tomasz (Tom)

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objectives: To compare the prevalence of and association between falls and frailty of prostate cancer survivors (PCSs) who were current, past or never users of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Mail and electronic survey. Participants: PCSs (N = 280; mean age 72 ± 8). Measurements: Cancer history, falls, and frailty status (robust, prefrail, frail) using traditionally defined and obese phenotypes. Results: Current (37%) or past (34%) ADT users were more than twice as likely to have fallen in the previous year as never users (15%) (P = .002). ADT users had twice as many recurrent falls (P < .001) and more fall-related injuries than unexposed men (P = .01). Current (43%) or past (40%) ADT users were more likely to be classified as prefrail or frail than never users (15%) (P < .001), and the prevalence of combined obese frailty + prefrailty was even greater in current (59%) or past (62%) ADT users than never users (25%) (P < .001). Traditional and obese frailty significantly increased the likelihood of reporting falls in the previous year (odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.18-3.94 and OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.62-5.58, respectively) and was also associated with greater risk of recurrent falls (OR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.48-6.5 and OR = 3.99, 95% CI = 1.79-8.89, respectively). Conclusions: Current and past exposure to ADT is linked to higher risk of falls and frailty than no treatment. PCSs should be appropriately counseled on fall prevention strategies, and approaches to reduce frailty should be considered.

AB - Objectives: To compare the prevalence of and association between falls and frailty of prostate cancer survivors (PCSs) who were current, past or never users of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Mail and electronic survey. Participants: PCSs (N = 280; mean age 72 ± 8). Measurements: Cancer history, falls, and frailty status (robust, prefrail, frail) using traditionally defined and obese phenotypes. Results: Current (37%) or past (34%) ADT users were more than twice as likely to have fallen in the previous year as never users (15%) (P = .002). ADT users had twice as many recurrent falls (P < .001) and more fall-related injuries than unexposed men (P = .01). Current (43%) or past (40%) ADT users were more likely to be classified as prefrail or frail than never users (15%) (P < .001), and the prevalence of combined obese frailty + prefrailty was even greater in current (59%) or past (62%) ADT users than never users (25%) (P < .001). Traditional and obese frailty significantly increased the likelihood of reporting falls in the previous year (odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.18-3.94 and OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.62-5.58, respectively) and was also associated with greater risk of recurrent falls (OR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.48-6.5 and OR = 3.99, 95% CI = 1.79-8.89, respectively). Conclusions: Current and past exposure to ADT is linked to higher risk of falls and frailty than no treatment. PCSs should be appropriately counseled on fall prevention strategies, and approaches to reduce frailty should be considered.

KW - Androgens

KW - Falls

KW - Frailty

KW - Prostate cancer

KW - Survivorship

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U2 - 10.1111/jgs.14795

DO - 10.1111/jgs.14795

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JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

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