Faculty development initiatives to advance research literacy and evidence-based practice at CAM academic institutions

Cynthia R. Long, Deborah L. Ackerman, Richard Hammerschlag, Louise Delagran, David H. Peterson, Michelle Berlin, Roni L. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To present the varied approaches of 9 complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions (all grantees of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) used to develop faculty expertise in research literacy and evidence-based practice (EBP) in order to integrate these concepts into CAM curricula. Design: A survey to elicit information on the faculty development initiatives was administered via e-mail to the 9 program directors. All 9 completed the survey, and 8 grantees provided narrative summaries of faculty training outcomes. Results: The grantees found the following strategies for implementing their programs most useful: assess needs, develop and adopt research literacy and EBP competencies, target early adopters and change leaders, employ best practices in teaching and education, provide meaningful incentives, capitalize on resources provided by grant partners, provide external training opportunities, and garner support from institutional leadership. Instructional approaches varied considerably across grantees. The most common were workshops, online resources, in-person short courses, and in-depth seminar series developed by the grantees. Many also sent faculty to intensive multiday extramural training programs. Program evaluation included measuring participation rates and satisfaction and the integration of research literacy and EBP learning objectives throughout the academic curricula. Most grantees measured longitudinal changes in beliefs, attitudes, opinions, and competencies with repeated faculty surveys. Conclusions: A common need across all 9 CAM grantee institutions was foundational training for faculty in research literacy and EBP. Therefore, each grantee institution developed and implemented a faculty development program. In developing the framework for their programs, grantees used strategies that were viewed critical for success, including making them multifaceted and unique to their specific institutional needs. These strategies, in conjunction with the grantees' instructional approaches, can be of practical use in other CAM and non-CAM academic environments considering the introduction of research literacy and EBP competencies into their curricula.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-570
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2014

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Evidence-Based Practice
Complementary Therapies
Research
Curriculum
Education
Literacy
Organized Financing
Program Evaluation
Postal Service
Practice Guidelines
Motivation
Teaching
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Faculty development initiatives to advance research literacy and evidence-based practice at CAM academic institutions. / Long, Cynthia R.; Ackerman, Deborah L.; Hammerschlag, Richard; Delagran, Louise; Peterson, David H.; Berlin, Michelle; Evans, Roni L.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 7, 01.07.2014, p. 563-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Long, Cynthia R. ; Ackerman, Deborah L. ; Hammerschlag, Richard ; Delagran, Louise ; Peterson, David H. ; Berlin, Michelle ; Evans, Roni L. / Faculty development initiatives to advance research literacy and evidence-based practice at CAM academic institutions. In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 7. pp. 563-570.
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