Factors that determine the in vivo dose-response relationship for stable chromosome aberrations in A-bomb survivors.

A. A. Awa, M. Nakano, K. Ohtaki, Y. Kodama, J. Lucas, Joe Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An overview is given of the dose-response relationship for stable chromosome aberrations (i.e., translocations and inversions) in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima. Special emphasis is placed on (i) the overdispersion of survivor cases with either unexpectedly high or low aberration frequencies relative to the estimated DS86 kerma values assigned to individual survivors, termed "cytogenetic outliers", and (ii) the correlation of chromosome aberration frequencies with other biological endpoints, such as acute radiation symptoms (severe epilation). A new molecular biological technique, known as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with composite, whole-chromosome probes to paint differentially the target chromosomes, has facilitated rapid, efficient, and extensive scoring of translocation-type chromosome aberrations in which the target chromosomes are involved. Using this methodology, the observed findings on translocation frequencies in A-bomb survivors have shown that the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations, which have persisted for years without change in frequency in irradiated persons, is indeed useful as an indicator for biological dosimetry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-214
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Radiation Research
Volume33 Suppl
StatePublished - Mar 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Bombs
chromosome aberrations
Chromosome Aberrations
dose response
Survivors
chromosomes
dosage
Chromosomes
Hair Removal
Paint
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Cytogenetics
scoring
paints
lymphocytes
fluorescence in situ hybridization
endpoints
cytogenetics
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
blood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Factors that determine the in vivo dose-response relationship for stable chromosome aberrations in A-bomb survivors. / Awa, A. A.; Nakano, M.; Ohtaki, K.; Kodama, Y.; Lucas, J.; Gray, Joe.

In: Journal of Radiation Research, Vol. 33 Suppl, 03.1992, p. 206-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Awa, A. A. ; Nakano, M. ; Ohtaki, K. ; Kodama, Y. ; Lucas, J. ; Gray, Joe. / Factors that determine the in vivo dose-response relationship for stable chromosome aberrations in A-bomb survivors. In: Journal of Radiation Research. 1992 ; Vol. 33 Suppl. pp. 206-214.
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