Factors predicting the presence of esophageal or gastric varices in patients with advanced liver disease

Atif Zaman, Ronald Hapke, Kenneth Flora, Hugo R. Rosen, Kent Benner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Recently it has been recommended that all cirrhotic patients without previous variceal hemorrhage undergo endoscopic screening to detect varices and that those with large varices should be treated with β-blockers (American College of Gastroenterology guidelines). However, endoscopic screening only of patients at highest risk for varices may be the most cost effective. METHODS: Ninety-eight patients without a history of variceal hemorrhage underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy as part of a liver transplant evaluation. Univariate/multivariate analysis was used to evaluate associations between the presence of varices and patient characteristics including etiology of liver disease, Child-Pugh class, physical findings (spider angiomata, splenomegaly, and ascites), encephalopathy, laboratory parameters (prothrombin time, albumin, bilirubin, BUN, creatinine, and platelets), and abdominal ultrasound findings (portal vein diameter/flow, splenomegaly, and ascites). RESULTS: The causes of cirrhosis among the 67 men and 31 women (mean age, 48 yr) included 28% Hepatitis C/alcoholism, 25% Hepatitis C, 13% alcoholism, 9% primary sclerosing cholangitis/primary biliary cirrhosis, 9% cryptogenic, 6% Hepatitis B, 1% Hepatitis B and C, and 9% other. Patients were Child-Pugh class A 34%, B 51%, and C 15%. Endoscopic findings included esophageal varices in 68% of patients (30% were large), gastric varices in 15%, and portal hypertensive gastropathy in 58%. Platelet count

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3292-3296
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume94
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

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Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Liver Diseases
Varicose Veins
Hepatitis C
Splenomegaly
Hepatitis B
Ascites
Alcoholism
Hemorrhage
Digestive System Endoscopy
Sclerosing Cholangitis
Spiders
Biliary Liver Cirrhosis
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Prothrombin Time
Brain Diseases
Hemangioma
Portal Vein
Platelet Count
Bilirubin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Factors predicting the presence of esophageal or gastric varices in patients with advanced liver disease. / Zaman, Atif; Hapke, Ronald; Flora, Kenneth; Rosen, Hugo R.; Benner, Kent.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 94, No. 11, 11.1999, p. 3292-3296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zaman, Atif ; Hapke, Ronald ; Flora, Kenneth ; Rosen, Hugo R. ; Benner, Kent. / Factors predicting the presence of esophageal or gastric varices in patients with advanced liver disease. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1999 ; Vol. 94, No. 11. pp. 3292-3296.
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