Factors influencing medical student self-competence to provide weight management services

R. S. Doshi, K. A. Gudzune, L. N. Dyrbye, J. F. Dovidio, S. E. Burke, R. O. White, S. Perry, M. Yeazel, Michelle van Ryn, S. M. Phelan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to identify factors associated with high obesity care self-competence among US medical students. The authors performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2014 survey data on fourth year medical students collected online as part of the Medical Student Cognitive Habits and Growth Evaluation Study (CHANGES). Independent variables included quality and quantity of interaction with patients and peers with obesity; hours of communication and partnership skills training; negative remarks against patients with obesity by supervising physicians, and witnessed discrimination against patients with obesity. The dependent variable was self-competence in providing obesity care. Of 5823 students invited to participate, 3689 (63%) responded and were included in our analyses. Most students were white (65%), half were women and 42% had high self-competence in caring for patients with obesity. Factors associated with high self-competence included increased interaction with peers with obesity (39% vs. 49%, P < 0.001) and increased partnership skills training (32% vs. 61%, P < 0.001). Increased partnership skills training and quantity of interactions with peers with obesity were associated with high student self-competence in providing obesity-related care to patients. Medical schools might consider increasing partnership skills training to improve students' preparedness and skill in performing obesity-related care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e12288
JournalClinical obesity
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Students
Mental Competency
Obesity
Weights and Measures
Students
Self Care
Medical Schools
Habits
Patient Care
Cross-Sectional Studies
Communication
Physicians
Growth

Keywords

  • Medical education
  • obesity
  • self-competence
  • weight management services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Doshi, R. S., Gudzune, K. A., Dyrbye, L. N., Dovidio, J. F., Burke, S. E., White, R. O., ... Phelan, S. M. (2019). Factors influencing medical student self-competence to provide weight management services. Clinical obesity, 9(1), e12288. https://doi.org/10.1111/cob.12288

Factors influencing medical student self-competence to provide weight management services. / Doshi, R. S.; Gudzune, K. A.; Dyrbye, L. N.; Dovidio, J. F.; Burke, S. E.; White, R. O.; Perry, S.; Yeazel, M.; van Ryn, Michelle; Phelan, S. M.

In: Clinical obesity, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. e12288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doshi, RS, Gudzune, KA, Dyrbye, LN, Dovidio, JF, Burke, SE, White, RO, Perry, S, Yeazel, M, van Ryn, M & Phelan, SM 2019, 'Factors influencing medical student self-competence to provide weight management services', Clinical obesity, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. e12288. https://doi.org/10.1111/cob.12288
Doshi RS, Gudzune KA, Dyrbye LN, Dovidio JF, Burke SE, White RO et al. Factors influencing medical student self-competence to provide weight management services. Clinical obesity. 2019 Feb 1;9(1):e12288. https://doi.org/10.1111/cob.12288
Doshi, R. S. ; Gudzune, K. A. ; Dyrbye, L. N. ; Dovidio, J. F. ; Burke, S. E. ; White, R. O. ; Perry, S. ; Yeazel, M. ; van Ryn, Michelle ; Phelan, S. M. / Factors influencing medical student self-competence to provide weight management services. In: Clinical obesity. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. e12288.
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