Factors associated with interval adherence to mammography screening in a population-based sample of New Hampshire women

Patricia (Patty) Carney, Beth G. Harwood, Julie E. Weiss, M. Scottie Eliassen, Martha E. Goodrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Interval adherence to mammography screening continues to be lower than experts advise. The authors evaluated, using a population-based mammography registry, factors associated with adherence to recommended mammography screening intervals. METHODS. The authors identified and recruited 625 women aged 50 years and older who did and did not adhere to interval mammography screening. Demographic and risk characteristics were ascertained from the registry and were supplemented with responses on a mailed survey to assess knowledge, perceived risk, anxiety regarding breast carcinoma and its detection, and women's experiences with mammography. RESULTS. The authors found no differences in risk factors or psychologic profiles between adhering and nonadhering women. Women who did not adhere had a statistically higher body mass index than women who did adhere (27.6 versus 26.1, P = 0.003). Exploration of mammographic experiences by group found that care taken by technologists in performing or talking women through the exam was higher in adhering women than nonadhering women (75.6% vs 65.71% for performing the exam, and 71.6% vs 60.8% for talking patients through the exam, respectively, P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS. The authors found that previous negative mammographic experiences, particularly those involving mammography technologists, appear to influence interval adherence to screening and that patient body size may be an important factor in this negative experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume95
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Mammography
Population
Registries
Body Size
Body Mass Index
Anxiety
Demography
Breast Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Breast carcinoma screening
  • Early detection
  • Mammography screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Factors associated with interval adherence to mammography screening in a population-based sample of New Hampshire women. / Carney, Patricia (Patty); Harwood, Beth G.; Weiss, Julie E.; Eliassen, M. Scottie; Goodrich, Martha E.

In: Cancer, Vol. 95, No. 2, 15.07.2002, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carney, Patricia (Patty) ; Harwood, Beth G. ; Weiss, Julie E. ; Eliassen, M. Scottie ; Goodrich, Martha E. / Factors associated with interval adherence to mammography screening in a population-based sample of New Hampshire women. In: Cancer. 2002 ; Vol. 95, No. 2. pp. 219-227.
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