Factors affecting parental satisfaction following pediatric procedural sedation

Vincent K. Lew, Kirk Lalwani, Tonya M. Palermo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To investigate factors affecting parental satisfaction with a pediatric sedation service in a university hospital setting. Design: Prospective, observational study with interviews using a survey instrument. Setting: Academic university hospital. Subjects: Parents (or legal guardians; hereafter "parents") of 220 children scheduled for sedation with the hospital's pediatric sedation service. Interventions and Measurements: Caregivers of children scheduled for sedation were interviewed using a validated survey instrument. The instrument was designed to investigate the quality of communication, environment, care provided, and the overall experience. We followed patients by telephone the day after discharge. Chi-square or linear-by-linear association tests were used to evaluate associations between satisfaction scores and demographic variables; the Mann-Whitney test was used for mean levels of satisfaction in anxious versus non-anxious children. Main Results: Of 222 parents approached, 220 agreed to participate (response rate = 99.1%). Significant associations between each area of satisfaction and parents' overall satisfaction existed (P <0.001). Previous sedations, types of sedation, age of child, or any individual provider were not significantly associated with overall satisfaction. Caregivers of anxious children reported less satisfaction than caregivers of non-anxious children. Parents of children who underwent magnetic resonance imaging reported the lowest mean satisfaction scores. Conclusions: Overall satisfaction was high, and care provided by anesthesiologists was significantly associated with overall satisfaction. A site in our institution was associated with significantly lower satisfaction as a result of inadequate space and privacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-34
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Parents
Caregivers
Legal Guardians
Personal Space
Pediatric Hospitals
Telephone
Observational Studies
Communication
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Demography
Prospective Studies
Interviews

Keywords

  • Children
  • Parental satisfaction
  • Pediatrics
  • Sedation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Factors affecting parental satisfaction following pediatric procedural sedation. / Lew, Vincent K.; Lalwani, Kirk; Palermo, Tonya M.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 22, No. 1, 02.2010, p. 29-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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