Exposure to a high-fat diet during early development programs behavior and impairs the central serotonergic system in juvenile non-human primates

Jacqueline R. Thompson, Jeanette C. Valleau, Ashley N. Barling, Juliana G. Franco, Madison DeCapo, Jennifer L. Bagley, Elinor Sullivan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Perinatal exposure to maternal obesity and high-fat diet (HFD) consumption not only poses metabolic risks to offspring but also impacts brain development and mental health. Using a non-human primate model, we observed a persistent increase in anxiety in juvenile offspring exposed to a maternal HFD. Postweaning HFD consumption also increased anxiety and independently increased stereotypic behaviors. These behavioral changes were associated with modified cortisol stress response and impairments in the development of the central serotonin synthesis, with altered tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression in the dorsal and median raphe. Postweaning HFD consumption decreased serotonergic immunoreactivity in area 10 of the prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to HFD consumption programs development of the brain and endocrine system, leading to behavioral impairments associated with mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders. Also, an early nutritional intervention (consumption of the control diet at weaning) was not sufficient to ameliorate many of the behavioral changes, such as increased anxiety, that were induced by maternal HFD consumption. Given the level of dietary fat consumption and maternal obesity in developed nations these findings have important implications for the mental health of future generations.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number164
    JournalFrontiers in Endocrinology
    Volume8
    Issue numberJUL
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 21 2017

    Fingerprint

    High Fat Diet
    Primates
    Mental Health
    Anxiety
    Mothers
    Obesity
    Tryptophan Hydroxylase
    Maternal Exposure
    Endocrine System
    Program Development
    Dietary Fats
    Social Responsibility
    Brain
    Weaning
    Prefrontal Cortex
    Developed Countries
    Mental Disorders
    Hydrocortisone
    Serotonin
    Diet

    Keywords

    • Anxiety
    • Cortisol
    • High-fat diet
    • Maternal
    • Mental health
    • Neurodevelopmental
    • Obesity
    • Serotonin
    • Stereotypy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    Cite this

    Exposure to a high-fat diet during early development programs behavior and impairs the central serotonergic system in juvenile non-human primates. / Thompson, Jacqueline R.; Valleau, Jeanette C.; Barling, Ashley N.; Franco, Juliana G.; DeCapo, Madison; Bagley, Jennifer L.; Sullivan, Elinor.

    In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol. 8, No. JUL, 164, 21.07.2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Thompson, Jacqueline R. ; Valleau, Jeanette C. ; Barling, Ashley N. ; Franco, Juliana G. ; DeCapo, Madison ; Bagley, Jennifer L. ; Sullivan, Elinor. / Exposure to a high-fat diet during early development programs behavior and impairs the central serotonergic system in juvenile non-human primates. In: Frontiers in Endocrinology. 2017 ; Vol. 8, No. JUL.
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