Exposure of early pediatric trainees to blood and marrow transplantation leads to higher recruitment to the field

Evan Shereck, Shalini Shenoy, Michael Pulsipher, Linda Burns, Arthur Bracey, Jeffrey Chell, Edward Snyder, Eneida Nemecek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) projects the need for allogeneic unrelated blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) in the United States as 10,000 per year. Although the NMDP is preparing to facilitate that number by the year 2015, there are several barriers to meeting this goal, including the need to recruit more health care personnel, including BMT physicians. To learn how best to recruit BMT physicians, we examined why practicing BMT physicians chose to enter the field and why others did not. We conducted a Web-based survey among pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) and BMT physician providers and trainees to identify the factors influencing their decision to choose or not choose a career in BMT. Out of 259 respondents (48% male, 74% of Caucasian origin), 94 self-identified as BMT physicians, 112 as PHO physicians, and 53 as PHO trainees. The PHO and BMT providers spent an average of 53% of their time in clinical activities. More than two-thirds of PHO providers reported providing BMT services at their institutions, most commonly for inpatient coverage (73%). The proportion of providers exposed to BMT early in training was significantly higher among BMT providers compared with PHO providers (51% versus 18% in medical school [. P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1399-1402
Number of pages4
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Transplantation
Bone Marrow
Pediatrics
Hematology
Physicians
Tissue Donors
Medical Schools
Health Personnel
Inpatients
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Bone marrow transplantation
  • Pediatric
  • Physician capacity
  • Recruitment
  • Workforce

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Hematology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Exposure of early pediatric trainees to blood and marrow transplantation leads to higher recruitment to the field. / Shereck, Evan; Shenoy, Shalini; Pulsipher, Michael; Burns, Linda; Bracey, Arthur; Chell, Jeffrey; Snyder, Edward; Nemecek, Eneida.

In: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Vol. 19, No. 9, 09.2013, p. 1399-1402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shereck, Evan ; Shenoy, Shalini ; Pulsipher, Michael ; Burns, Linda ; Bracey, Arthur ; Chell, Jeffrey ; Snyder, Edward ; Nemecek, Eneida. / Exposure of early pediatric trainees to blood and marrow transplantation leads to higher recruitment to the field. In: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 1399-1402.
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