Exploring educational needs of multiple sclerosis care providers: Results of a care-provider survey

Aaron P. Turner, Christine Martin, Rhonda M. Williams, Kelly Goudreau, James D. Bowen, Michael Hatzakis, Ruth Whitham, Dennis Bourdette, Lynne Walker, Jodie K. Haselkorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our objective was to survey experienced multiple sclerosis (MS) care providers, determine their ongoing professional educational needs, and develop future education programs. We asked providers across a variety of disciplines to identify the areas in which clinical consultation and continuing medical education (CME) would most improve their ability to provide care to individuals with MS; their preferred education modalities; and their confidence in providing care related to disease-modifying agents (DMAs), fatigue, depression, spasticity, and bladder management. At a national meeting of MS professionals, 152 MS care providers completed a self-report survey that was designed for this cross-sectional cohort study. Areas of greatest interest for clinical consultation and CME were identical and included cognition, fatigue, DMA use, spasticity, pain, sex, diagnosis of MS, and depression. Participants expressed a preference for live and interactive CME modalities. Confidence in providing specific disease-related care sometimes differed between Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and non-VHA providers. The results indicate that clinical consultations and CME should be targeted to the topics of greatest interest identified by providers and delivered in a live or interactive modality whenever possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-34
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Medical education
Continuing Medical Education
Multiple Sclerosis
Referral and Consultation
Education
Health
Fatigue of materials
Fatigue
Depression
Veterans Health
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Aptitude
Self Report
Cognition
Urinary Bladder
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pain

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Depression
  • Disease-modifying agents
  • Education
  • Fatigue
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Multiple sclerosis diagnosis
  • Pain
  • Sexual function
  • Spasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Turner, A. P., Martin, C., Williams, R. M., Goudreau, K., Bowen, J. D., Hatzakis, M., ... Haselkorn, J. K. (2006). Exploring educational needs of multiple sclerosis care providers: Results of a care-provider survey. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 43(1), 25-34. https://doi.org/10.1682/JRRD.2006.11.0139

Exploring educational needs of multiple sclerosis care providers : Results of a care-provider survey. / Turner, Aaron P.; Martin, Christine; Williams, Rhonda M.; Goudreau, Kelly; Bowen, James D.; Hatzakis, Michael; Whitham, Ruth; Bourdette, Dennis; Walker, Lynne; Haselkorn, Jodie K.

In: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Vol. 43, No. 1, 2006, p. 25-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turner, Aaron P. ; Martin, Christine ; Williams, Rhonda M. ; Goudreau, Kelly ; Bowen, James D. ; Hatzakis, Michael ; Whitham, Ruth ; Bourdette, Dennis ; Walker, Lynne ; Haselkorn, Jodie K. / Exploring educational needs of multiple sclerosis care providers : Results of a care-provider survey. In: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development. 2006 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 25-34.
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