Experimental studies With a 9F forward-looking intracardiac imaging and ablation catheter

Douglas N. Stephens, Matthew O'Donnell, Kai Thomenius, Aaron Dentinger, Douglas Wildes, Peter Chen, K. Kirk Shung, Jonathan Cannata, Pierre Khuri-Yakub, Omer Oralkan, Aman Mahajan, Kalyanam Shivkumar, David Sahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-resolution, near-field- optimized 14-MHz, 24-element broad-bandwidth forward-looking array for integration on a steerable 9F electrophysiology (EP) catheter. Methods. Several generations of prototype imaging catheters with bidirectional steering, termed microlinear (ML), were built and tested as integrated catheter designs with EP sensing electrodes near the tip. The wide-bandwidth ultrasound array was mounted on the very tip, equipped with an aperture of only 1.2 by 1.58 mm. The array pulse echo performance was fully simulated, and its construction offered shielding from ablation noise. Both ex vivo and in vivo imaging with a porcine animal model were performed. Results. The array pulse echo performance was concordant with Krimholtz-Leedom-Matthaei model simulation. Three generations of prototype devices were tested in the right atrium and ventricle in 4 acute pig studies for the following characteristics: (1) image quality, (2) anatomic identification, (3) visualization of other catheter devices, and (4) for a mechanism for stabilization when imaging ablation. The ML catheter is capable of both low-artifact ablation imaging on a standard clinical imaging system and high-frame rate myocardial wall strain rate imaging for detecting changes in cardiac mechanics associated with ablation. Conclusions. The imaging resolution performance of this very small array device, together with its penetration beyond 2 cm, is excellent considering its very small array aperture. The forward-looking intracardiac catheter has been adapted to work easily on an existing commercial imaging platform with very minor software modifications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-215
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume28
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

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Cardiac Catheters
Catheters
Electrophysiology
Equipment and Supplies
Pulse
Swine
Heart Atria
Mechanics
Artifacts
Heart Ventricles
Noise
Electrodes
Software
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Ablation
  • Electrophysiology
  • Interventional guidance
  • Intracardiac ultrasound array
  • Miniaturized

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stephens, D. N., O'Donnell, M., Thomenius, K., Dentinger, A., Wildes, D., Chen, P., ... Sahn, D. (2009). Experimental studies With a 9F forward-looking intracardiac imaging and ablation catheter. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 28(2), 207-215.

Experimental studies With a 9F forward-looking intracardiac imaging and ablation catheter. / Stephens, Douglas N.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Thomenius, Kai; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Chen, Peter; Shung, K. Kirk; Cannata, Jonathan; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Oralkan, Omer; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Sahn, David.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 207-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stephens, DN, O'Donnell, M, Thomenius, K, Dentinger, A, Wildes, D, Chen, P, Shung, KK, Cannata, J, Khuri-Yakub, P, Oralkan, O, Mahajan, A, Shivkumar, K & Sahn, D 2009, 'Experimental studies With a 9F forward-looking intracardiac imaging and ablation catheter', Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 207-215.
Stephens DN, O'Donnell M, Thomenius K, Dentinger A, Wildes D, Chen P et al. Experimental studies With a 9F forward-looking intracardiac imaging and ablation catheter. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2009 Feb 1;28(2):207-215.
Stephens, Douglas N. ; O'Donnell, Matthew ; Thomenius, Kai ; Dentinger, Aaron ; Wildes, Douglas ; Chen, Peter ; Shung, K. Kirk ; Cannata, Jonathan ; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre ; Oralkan, Omer ; Mahajan, Aman ; Shivkumar, Kalyanam ; Sahn, David. / Experimental studies With a 9F forward-looking intracardiac imaging and ablation catheter. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 207-215.
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AU - Shung, K. Kirk

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