Experimental Mandibular Regrowth by Distraction Osteogenesis: Long-term Results

Peter D. Costantino, Craig D. Friedman, Maisie Shindo, Glenn Houston, George A. Sisson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of gradual distraction to grow bone (distraction osteogenesis) has gained widespread orthopedic acceptance, but has only recently been applied to craniofacial skeletal defects. The use of bifocal distraction osteogenesis to fill experimental segmental mandibular defects with regenerate bone was recently reported. Though all canines in that study demonstrated normal oromandibular function, they were observed for only 4 weeks following defect closure. The study that is now reported describes the long-term (12-month) functional, morphologic, and biomechanical results when bifocal distraction osteogenesis was applied to the same model. In this long-term study, three canines had 2.5-cm unilateral segmental mandibular body defects filled with structurally stable bone using bifocal distraction osteogenesis. These dogs exhibited normal oromandibular function for 1 year following segment regrowth and external fixator removal. Macroscopic and histologic evaluation of the regrown segments revealed a re-formation of the cortical and medullary architecture. Stress testing demonstrated the average ultimate strength of the regrown segment at 53 MPa, which corresponded to 77%±5.7% of normal mandibular bone. The data suggest that clinical trials applying this technique to segmental mandibular reconstruction are warranted. (Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993;119:511-516).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-516
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume119
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Distraction Osteogenesis
Bone and Bones
Canidae
Mandibular Reconstruction
External Fixators
Orthopedics
Head
Clinical Trials
Dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Experimental Mandibular Regrowth by Distraction Osteogenesis : Long-term Results. / Costantino, Peter D.; Friedman, Craig D.; Shindo, Maisie; Houston, Glenn; Sisson, George A.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 119, No. 5, 1993, p. 511-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costantino, Peter D. ; Friedman, Craig D. ; Shindo, Maisie ; Houston, Glenn ; Sisson, George A. / Experimental Mandibular Regrowth by Distraction Osteogenesis : Long-term Results. In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 1993 ; Vol. 119, No. 5. pp. 511-516.
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