Expectancy Effect in Three Mind-Body Clinical Trials

Matthew Hicks, Douglas Hanes, Helana Wahbeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Expectancy, arguably the prime component of the placebo effect, has been shown to significantly modify the effects of many treatments. Furthermore, various forms of mind-body interventions have demonstrated effective improvements in outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between pretreatment expectations and symptom reduction in a secondary analysis of 3 mind-body intervention programs. An adjusted correlation and regression analysis compared data from a 6-question expectancy questionnaire to a self-reported clinical impression of change score. Only 1 of the 6 expectancy questions in 1 of the 3 studies reached significance (B = 0.087; P =.025). The combined data from all 3 studies did not reveal significant expectancy effects. The positive effects of mindfulness meditation appear to be independent of an expectancy effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)NP103-NP109
JournalJournal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Mindfulness
Meditation
Placebo Effect
Regression Analysis
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • expectancy
  • meditation
  • mind-body
  • mindfulness-based stress reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Expectancy Effect in Three Mind-Body Clinical Trials. / Hicks, Matthew; Hanes, Douglas; Wahbeh, Helana.

In: Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. NP103-NP109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hicks, Matthew ; Hanes, Douglas ; Wahbeh, Helana. / Expectancy Effect in Three Mind-Body Clinical Trials. In: Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. NP103-NP109.
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