Excitatory interactions between glutamate receptors and protein kinases

Thomas Soderling, S. E. Tan, E. McGlade-McCulloh, H. Yamamoto, K. Fukunaga

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    49 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    One of the most active areas of neurobiology research concerns mechanisms involved in paradigms of synaptic plasticity. A popular model for cellular learning and memory is long term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus. LTP requires postsynaptic influx of Ca2+ which triggers multiple biochemical pathways resulting in pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms enhancing long term synaptic efficiency. This article focuses on an acute postsynaptic mechanism that can enhance responsiveness of glutamate receptors. Evidence is presented that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, the major postsynaptic density protein at excitatory glutaminergic synapses, can phosphorylate glutamate receptors and enhance ion current flowing through them.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)304-311
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Neurobiology
    Volume25
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    glutamate 5-kinase
    Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
    Long-Term Potentiation
    Glutamate Receptors
    Protein Kinases
    Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases
    Neuronal Plasticity
    Neurobiology
    Synapses
    Hippocampus
    Learning
    Ions
    Efficiency
    Research

    Keywords

    • glutamate receptors
    • protein kinases
    • synaptic plasticity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience(all)

    Cite this

    Soderling, T., Tan, S. E., McGlade-McCulloh, E., Yamamoto, H., & Fukunaga, K. (1994). Excitatory interactions between glutamate receptors and protein kinases. Journal of Neurobiology, 25(3), 304-311.

    Excitatory interactions between glutamate receptors and protein kinases. / Soderling, Thomas; Tan, S. E.; McGlade-McCulloh, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukunaga, K.

    In: Journal of Neurobiology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 1994, p. 304-311.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Soderling, T, Tan, SE, McGlade-McCulloh, E, Yamamoto, H & Fukunaga, K 1994, 'Excitatory interactions between glutamate receptors and protein kinases', Journal of Neurobiology, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 304-311.
    Soderling T, Tan SE, McGlade-McCulloh E, Yamamoto H, Fukunaga K. Excitatory interactions between glutamate receptors and protein kinases. Journal of Neurobiology. 1994;25(3):304-311.
    Soderling, Thomas ; Tan, S. E. ; McGlade-McCulloh, E. ; Yamamoto, H. ; Fukunaga, K. / Excitatory interactions between glutamate receptors and protein kinases. In: Journal of Neurobiology. 1994 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 304-311.
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