Examining mechanisms of brain control of bladder function with resting state functional connectivity MRI

Rahel Nardos, William (Tom) Gregory, Christine Krisky, Amanda Newell, Binyam Nardos, Bradley Schlaggar, Damien Fair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims This aim of this study is to identify the brain mechanisms involved in bladder control. Methods We used fMRI to identify brain regions that are activated during bladder filling. We then used resting state connectivity fMRI (rs-fcMRI) to assess functional connectivity of regions identified by fMRI with the rest of the brain as the bladder is filled to capacity. Results Female participants (n = 20) were between ages 40 and 64 with no significant history of symptomatic urinary incontinence. Main effect of time (MET) fMRI analysis resulted in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) that have significant change in BOLD signal (z = 3.25, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-501
Number of pages9
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Urinary Bladder
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Urinary Incontinence

Keywords

  • brain bladder control
  • brain imaging
  • functional MRI
  • overactive bladder
  • resting state connectivity MRI
  • urgency incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Urology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Examining mechanisms of brain control of bladder function with resting state functional connectivity MRI. / Nardos, Rahel; Gregory, William (Tom); Krisky, Christine; Newell, Amanda; Nardos, Binyam; Schlaggar, Bradley; Fair, Damien.

In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, Vol. 33, No. 5, 2014, p. 493-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ca438c344ee041e9babeea314963026c,
title = "Examining mechanisms of brain control of bladder function with resting state functional connectivity MRI",
abstract = "Aims This aim of this study is to identify the brain mechanisms involved in bladder control. Methods We used fMRI to identify brain regions that are activated during bladder filling. We then used resting state connectivity fMRI (rs-fcMRI) to assess functional connectivity of regions identified by fMRI with the rest of the brain as the bladder is filled to capacity. Results Female participants (n = 20) were between ages 40 and 64 with no significant history of symptomatic urinary incontinence. Main effect of time (MET) fMRI analysis resulted in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) that have significant change in BOLD signal (z = 3.25, P",
keywords = "brain bladder control, brain imaging, functional MRI, overactive bladder, resting state connectivity MRI, urgency incontinence",
author = "Rahel Nardos and Gregory, {William (Tom)} and Christine Krisky and Amanda Newell and Binyam Nardos and Bradley Schlaggar and Damien Fair",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/nau.22458",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "493--501",
journal = "Neurourology and Urodynamics",
issn = "0733-2467",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining mechanisms of brain control of bladder function with resting state functional connectivity MRI

AU - Nardos, Rahel

AU - Gregory, William (Tom)

AU - Krisky, Christine

AU - Newell, Amanda

AU - Nardos, Binyam

AU - Schlaggar, Bradley

AU - Fair, Damien

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Aims This aim of this study is to identify the brain mechanisms involved in bladder control. Methods We used fMRI to identify brain regions that are activated during bladder filling. We then used resting state connectivity fMRI (rs-fcMRI) to assess functional connectivity of regions identified by fMRI with the rest of the brain as the bladder is filled to capacity. Results Female participants (n = 20) were between ages 40 and 64 with no significant history of symptomatic urinary incontinence. Main effect of time (MET) fMRI analysis resulted in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) that have significant change in BOLD signal (z = 3.25, P

AB - Aims This aim of this study is to identify the brain mechanisms involved in bladder control. Methods We used fMRI to identify brain regions that are activated during bladder filling. We then used resting state connectivity fMRI (rs-fcMRI) to assess functional connectivity of regions identified by fMRI with the rest of the brain as the bladder is filled to capacity. Results Female participants (n = 20) were between ages 40 and 64 with no significant history of symptomatic urinary incontinence. Main effect of time (MET) fMRI analysis resulted in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) that have significant change in BOLD signal (z = 3.25, P

KW - brain bladder control

KW - brain imaging

KW - functional MRI

KW - overactive bladder

KW - resting state connectivity MRI

KW - urgency incontinence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902791214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84902791214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/nau.22458

DO - 10.1002/nau.22458

M3 - Article

C2 - 23908139

AN - SCOPUS:84902791214

VL - 33

SP - 493

EP - 501

JO - Neurourology and Urodynamics

JF - Neurourology and Urodynamics

SN - 0733-2467

IS - 5

ER -